Tag Archives: Surviving Sepsis Campaign

Updated Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines

Updated Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines (available in both Critical Care Medicine and Intensive Care Medicine) were released during the 46th Critical Care Congress, along with a viewpoint and synopsis published in JAMA. Materials are available at www.survivingsepsis.org.

Affiliated materials released in conjunction with the guidelines include:

– A Users’ Guide to the 2016 Surviving Sepsis Guidelines
Critical Care Medicine
Intensive Care Medicine

– Surviving Sepsis Guidelines: A Continuous Move Toward Better Care of Patients With Sepsis
JAMA Viewpoint

Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock
JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis

Practice guidelines as implementation science: the journal editorsʼ perspective
Critical Care Medicine
Intensive Care Medicine

Video: Comparison of recommendations from 2012 to 2016

Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2016 is a joint collaboration between the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

The guidelines, developed by a consensus committee of 55 international experts in sepsis, offer important advancements for clinicians caring for patients with sepsis and septic shock, starting with the need to identify at-risk patients sooner.

Keep the conversation going about the new sepsis guidelines by using #SCCMLive. You can also view video of the Congress session during which the guidelines were presented, which featured Laura E. Evans, MD, FCCM, Andrew Rhodes, FRCP, FRCA, FFICM, and Mitchell M. Levy, MD, MCCM, FCCP. The video also includes a session debrief with Lauren Epstein, MD, and R. Phillip Dellinger, MD, MCCM.

New Podcast Follows Up on SSC Concepts and Implementation

In the newly available iCritical Care podcast SCCM Pod-326 Surviving Sepsis Campaign: Creating Spread for Quality Improvement, Ludwig Lin, MD, speaks with Jane Taylor, Ed.D, about quality improvement science and her contributions to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign.

This podcast follows up on the concepts addressed in the Campaign’s Spreading Quality Just in Time series—a series of videos consisting of short tutorials on the science and methods behind applying interventions at the right time in the right way.

Spreading Quality Just in Time

This series is part of the Sepsis in the Wards project from the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. It is relevant to those seeking information on sepsis screening quality improvement but can also be used by hospitals interested in hospital-wide expansion of any quality improvement initiative.

New Self-Directed Sepsis Performance Improvement Course Is Now Available

pi-lg-SEPSISPIONImprove your strategies for the recognition and treatment of sepsis with Self-Directed Sepsis Performance Improvement. This online course provides a relaxed experience to learn at your own pace from the comfort and convenience of your home or office.

Sepsis remains a disorder of epidemic incidence and severe consequences, with an unacceptably high death rate and devastating long-term effects. Application of sepsis care tools has reduced mortality in hospitals that implemented the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Bundles. Published data clearly show that delays in the recognition and treatment of sepsis are associated with worse outcomes, while early treatment improves survival.

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess knowledge of the updated Surviving Sepsis Campaign Bundles
  • Collect data to assess compliance with bundle targets
  • Analyze performance data to assess compliance with the three-hour bundle
  • Implement educational interventions to address variations in performance outcomes
  • Re-collect data to determine improved compliance with bundle targets

Self-Directed Sepsis Performance Improvement includes 13 online videos with synchronized speaker audio. Physicians and nurses are eligible to receive 20 hours of continuing education credit.

Purchase Self-Directed Sepsis Performance Improvement today at the price of $110 for members ($145 for nonmembers). If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

On-Site Registration Available for Sepsis Without Walls Conference

On-site registration will be available on Friday, September 25, 2015, for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM’s) Sepsis Without Walls conference, which will be held at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. A staff member will be available to assist you at the SCCM registration desk in the Turner Concourse beginning at 7:00 a.m. on September 25.

SCCM is partnering with The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to offer this one-day interactive conference, which will focus on strategies to identify, diagnose and manage patients who present with signs and symptoms of sepsis, irrespective of the care unit in which they are located. Early detection of sepsis, with the timely administration of appropriate antibiotics, appears to be the single most important factor in reducing morbidity and mortality from sepsis. Join the multiprofessional panel of leading experts who will focus on problem solving through case studies in developing effective strategies in specific patient populations.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify cutting-edge diagnostic algorithms for pathogen identification in sepsis
  • Analyze and implement sepsis pathways for patients who are not yet located in the intensive care unit
  • Compare and contrast the efficacy of current infection control practices
  • Summarize effective antibiotic recommendations for common nosocomial infections

Please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888 with any questions.

Watch New Educational Tutorials from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign

The Sepsis in the Wards project, from the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, sought to ensure that every patient was screened for sepsis on every shift each day in a pilot inpatient ward. When the results of patient screening were positive, teams intervened with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign bundle.

Hospitals participating in the Sepsis in the Wards project shared insights on screening interventions and eventually facilitated knowledge transfer across units within the hospital.

The Spreading Quality Just in Time series offers short tutorials on the science and methods behind applying interventions at the right time in the right way. This series is relevant to those seeking information on sepsis screening quality improvement but can also be used by hospitals interested in hospital-wide expansion of any quality improvement initiative.

Spreading Quality Just in Time

Watch Sepsis-Related Video Recorded at 2015 Congress
Earn free continuing medical education credit by viewing this session from the 44th Critical Care Congress.
Fluids Make the Difference in Organ Function and Survival with Sepsis
Supported in part by an educational grant from Baxter Healthcare Corporation.
In this session, faculty discuss the current evidence for fluid therapy in sepsis, the application of individualized intravenous fluids based on composition and safety profile.

Reduced registration rates end September 2, 2015, for the Sepsis Without Walls conference, which will be held September 25, 2015, at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is partnering with Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to offer this one-day interactive conference, which will focus on strategies to identify, diagnose and treat patients who present with signs and symptoms of sepsis, irrespective of the care unit in which they are located.

JHM_2C_P_HEarly detection of sepsis, with the timely administration of appropriate antibiotics, appears to be the single most important factor in reducing morbidity and mortality from sepsis. Therefore, healthcare providers need to have a high index of suspicion for the presence of sepsis and must begin appropriate antimicrobials quickly. Join the multiprofessional panel of leading experts who will focus on problem solving through case studies in developing effective strategies in specific patient populations.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify cutting-edge diagnostic algorithms for pathogen identification in sepsis
  • Analyze and implement sepsis pathways for patients who are not yet located in the intensive care unit
  • Compare and contrast the efficacy of current infection control practices
  • Summarize effective antibiotic recommendations for common nosocomial infections

SCCMReserve your seat by September 2, 2015, to receive the reduced rate using your Customer ID and password, or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Take advantage of discounted hotel rates. A limited block of hotel rooms has been reserved for conference attendees and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Make your hotel reservation  by August 18, 2015, to receive SCCM’s discounted rate.

Results from IMPreSS Study Released

Results from the International Multicentre Prevalence Study on Sepsis (IMPreSS) were recently released.

IMPreSS was a global observational study undertaken by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) as part of their joint collaboration, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). The study looked at 1,794 patients from 62 countries who had either severe sepsis or septic shock. Compliance with the SSC bundles was tracked, as were outcomes. Compliance with all of the evidence-based bundle metrics was not high. However, successful completion of all elements was associated with a greater likelihood of survival after adjustment for confounders at both three and six hours.

The SSC is a joint collaboration of SCCM and ESICM committed to reducing mortality from severe sepsis and septic shock worldwide.

Early Registration Rates End Soon for Sepsis Without Walls Conference

Register by August 5, 2015, to receive the lowest registration rates for Sepsis Without Walls: Ensuring All Patients Receive Optimal, Time-Sensitive Care. The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is partnering with The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to offer this one-day interactive conference, which will be held September 25, 2015, at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Early detection of sepsis, with the timely administration of appropriate antibiotics, may be the single most important factor in reducing the morbidity and mortality of sepsis. This conference will focus on strategies to identify, diagnose and manage patients who present with signs and symptoms of sepsis, irrespective of the care unit in which they are located. Join the multiprofessional panel of leading experts who will focus on problem solving through case studies in developing effective strategies in specific patient populations.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify cutting-edge diagnostic algorithms for pathogen identification in sepsis
  • Analyze and implement sepsis pathways for patients who are not yet located in the intensive care unit
  • Compare and contrast the efficacy of current infection control practices
  • Summarize effective antibiotic recommendations for common nosocomial infections

Reserve your seat by August 5, 2015, to receive the reduced rate using your Customer ID and password, or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Take advantage of discounted hotel rates. A limited block of hotel rooms has been reserved for conference attendees and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Make your hotel reservation by August 18, 2015, to receive SCCM’s discounted rate.

Reduced Registration Rates Available for Sepsis Without Walls Conference

Reserve your seat today to receive discounted registration rates for Sepsis Without Walls: Ensuring All Patients Receive Optimal, Time-Sensitive Care. The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is partnering with The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to offer this one-day interactive conference, which will be held September 25, 2015, at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Early detection of sepsis, with the timely administration of appropriate antibiotics, may be the single most important factor in reducing the morbidity and mortality of sepsis. This conference will focus on strategies to identify, diagnose and manage patients who present with signs and symptoms of sepsis, irrespective of the care unit in which they are located. Join the multiprofessional panel of leading experts who will focus on problem solving through case studies in developing effective strategies in specific patient populations.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify cutting-edge diagnostic algorithms for pathogen identification in sepsis
  • Analyze and implement sepsis pathways for patients who are not yet located in the intensive care unit
  • Compare and contrast the efficacy of current infection control practices
  • Summarize effective antibiotic recommendations for common nosocomial infections

Register online using your Customer ID and password by August 5, 2015, to receive the reduced rate, or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Take advantage of discounted hotel rates. A limited block of hotel rooms has been reserved for conference attendees and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Make your hotel reservation by August 18, 2015, to receive SCCM’s discounted rate.

Register Now for Sepsis Without Walls Conference

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have partnered to bring you Sepsis Without Walls: Ensuring All Patients Receive Optimal, Time-Sensitive Care, which will be held September 25, 2015, at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The focus of this one-day interactive conference will be on strategies to identify, diagnose and manage patients who present with signs and symptoms of sepsis, irrespective of their care unit.

Early detection of sepsis, with the timely administration of appropriate antibiotics, appears to be the single most important factor in reducing morbidity and mortality from sepsis. Thus, healthcare providers need a high index of suspicion for the presence of sepsis and must begin appropriate antimicrobials quickly. Join the multiprofessional panel of leading experts who will focus on problem solving through case studies in developing effective strategies in specific patient populations.

Space for this course is limited. Register online or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888 to reserve your spot.

Surviving Sepsis Campaign Six-Hour Bundle Revised

The leadership of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) has believed since its inception that both the SSC guidelines and the SSC performance improvement indicators will evolve as new evidence improves our understanding of how best to care for patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

With publication of the results of the Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock (ProCESS) trial, the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) trial, and the Protocolised Management in Sepsis (ProMISe) trial, the SSC Executive Committee has revised elements of the six-hour bundle.

Register Now for Sepsis Without Walls Conference

JHM_2C_P_HEarly detection of sepsis, with the timely administration of appropriate antibiotics, appears to be the single most important factor in reducing morbidity and mortality from sepsis. The Society of Critical Care Medicine is partnering with The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to offer Sepsis Without Walls: Ensuring All Patients Receive Optimal, Time-Sensitive Care. This one-day interactive conference will focus on strategies to identify, diagnose and manage patients who present with signs and symptoms of sepsis, irrespective of their care unit.

It has become increasingly apparent that there is a long delay in both the recognition of sepsis and the initiation of appropriate therapy in many patients. This translates into an increased SCCM-Logo-Color-RGB-600pxincidence of progressive organ failure and a higher mortality. Healthcare providers, therefore, need a high index of suspicion for the presence of sepsis and must begin appropriate antimicrobials quickly. Join the multiprofessional panel of leading experts who will focus on problem solving through case studies in developing effective strategies in specific patient populations.

Register today for the Sepsis Without Walls conference, which will be held September 25, 2015, at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

SSC Releases Updated Statement in Response to ProCESS and ARISE Trials

The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) released an updated statement regarding hemodynamic and oximetric monitoring. The statement is in response to the Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock (ProCESS) and the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) trials.

The statement highlights recently released data from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, which confirms that “adherence to quality improvement measures in severe sepsis and septic shock is associated with mortality decline.” The research has been published online ahead of print in Critical Care Medicine and in Intensive Care Medicine. The final print version is scheduled to appear in the January 2015 edition of Critical Care Medicine.

Mitchell Levy Featured in CDC Expert Commentary Series Discussing Sepsis

Mitchell Levy, MD, FCCP, FCCM, 2012 co-chair of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines Committee, recently recorded a video for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in which he discusses the latest Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines and associated care bundles.

Recorded as part of the CDC Expert Commentary series — a joint collaboration of the CDC and Medscape — the video features Dr. Levy describing the efficacy of evidence-based care bundles. He also details SSC resources designed to aid guideline implementation efforts.

To learn more about these resources and the Campaign’s overall mission, visit www.survivingsepsis.org.

Also, a new CDC website has been created to increase sepsis awareness and improve early recognition, diagnosis and treatment. The site puts a spotlight on the many resources made available by the Campaign.

Hospitals Report Results of SSC Implementation

Four hospitals in Detroit reported their success in implementing the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC), demonstrating improved frequency of blood culture testing before antibiotic administration and significant improvement in the time to antibiotic treatment — from a mean of approximately 182 minutes to 92 minutes. The four hospitals participated in a study published in the Journal for Healthcare Quality.

“While guidelines provide a roadmap for patient care, successful implementation relies on consistent patterns of clinician practice to achieve optimal outcomes,” said lead author of the study and Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) member Maria Teresa Palleschi, CCRN, DNP, ACNP, of Detroit Medical Center. “Educating staff is essential to the process of improving patient outcomes, and the results of our study showed the relationship between education and sampling of lactate and blood cultures, as well as timeliness of antibiotic administration.”

Learn more about the tools needed to implement the SSC at www.survivingsepsis.org and get involved in the community at www.facebook.com/survivingsepsis.