Tag Archives: Sepsis

Join the CDC in Marking Sepsis Awareness Month

In honor of Sepsis Awareness Month this September, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has sponsored and/or promoted numerous events stressing the importance of detecting this life-threatening condition early and taking preventative measures.

Help to continue raising awareness by participating in the CDC’s webinar, Empowering Nurses for Early Sepsis Recognition, on Thursday, September 22, at 1:00 p.m. (CT).

Keep the conversation going on social media by using the following hashtag: #ThinkSepsis.

If you have not already done so, you are also encouraged to review resources related to the new sepsis definitions released earlier this year and to familiarize yourself with the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Surviving Sepsis Campaign and its THRIVE initiative, which centers on addressing post-intensive care syndrome (PICS).

Join the CDC in Marking Sepsis Awareness Month

September is Sepsis Awareness Month, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is sponsoring and/or promoting numerous events to stress the importance of detecting this life-threatening condition early and taking preventative measures.

All events to be held in September dovetail nicely with a Vital Signs report released by the CDC late last month that centered on sepsis. The release of the report coincided with a related press conference held by the CDC that featured CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden and Mitchell Levy, MD, MCCM, FCCP, a founding and Executive Committee member of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, discussing the report and emphasizing the importance of early identification.

Events in September include:

The 1st World Sepsis Congress – Thursday, September 8 and Friday, September 9
In 13 distinctive sessions, more than 70 speakers from more than 20 countries will give 10-minute keynotes and presentations on the number one preventable cause of death worldwide: sepsis. After each talk, the speakers will answer live questions from the audience.

Twitter Chat Centered on Sepsis – Tuesday, September 13, at 12:00 p.m. (CT)
The chat will feature Dr. Richard Besser of ABC News discussing sepsis. Dr. Richard Besser is the Chief Health and Medical Editor for ABC News. To participate, use #abcDrBchat.

CDC Webinar – Advances in Sepsis: Protecting Patients Throughout the Lifespan – Tuesday, September 13, at 2:00 p.m. (CT)

CDC Webinar – Empowering Nurses for Early Sepsis Recognition – Thursday, September 22, at 1:00 p.m. (CT)

Before, during and after the above events, you are encouraged to keep the conversation going on social media by using the following hashtag: #ThinkSepsis.

If you have not already done so, you are also encouraged to review resources related to the new sepsis definitions released earlier this year and to familiarize yourself with the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Surviving Sepsis Campaign and its THRIVE initiative, which centers on addressing post-intensive care syndrome (PICS).

Participate in Twitter Chat Centered on Sepsis

You are encouraged to participate in a twitter chat on Tuesday, September 13, 2016, at 12:00 p.m. (CT) that will feature Dr. Richard Besser of ABC News discussing sepsis. Dr. Richard Besser is the Chief Health and Medical Editor for ABC News.

To participate, use #abcDrBchat. This chat is part of World Sepsis Day, which is on September 13.

If you have not already done so, you are encouraged to review resources related to the new sepsis definitions released earlier this year in advance of the twitter chat.

Participate in Journal Club Twitter Chat on Sepsis Definitions

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Social Media Task Force will host a Journal Club Twitter chat regarding the new sepsis definitions on Wednesday, June 22, 2016, from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Central Time. Special guest, SCCM President Todd Dorman, MD, FCCM, will be on hand as SCCM Social Media Task Force member Mary E. Lough, CCRN, CNS, PhD, RN, moderates.

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, FCCM, a lead author of the article, The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3), and Manu Shankar-Hari, MD, MSc, also an author on Sepsis-3, will discuss and take questions via Twitter about the article. Released in February by the Journal of the American Medical Association, this popular article has been viewed more than 1 million times, making it one of the top 5% research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.

Dr. Shankar-Hari also offers insight into the processes of the Sepsis Definitions Task Force in Developing a New Definition and Assessing New Clinical Criteria for Septic Shock, of which he is the lead author.

These thought leaders will offer highlights for understanding Sepsis-3 and related clinical assessment, take questions via Twitter related to the material and offer additional resources. We expect robust discussion about the impact of Sepsis-3, items of clarification and thoughtful questions from the audience.

Come prepared with relevant questions and make sure to use #SCCMJC and #SepsisRedefined in your tweets.

What is a Twitter chat?
A Twitter chat is a live event on Twitter, moderated and focused around a general topic. To filter all the chatter on Twitter into a single conversation, a hashtag is used. A set time is also established.

Find your chat leaders.

– Follow these sepsis thought leaders on Twitter: @CDMD62 (Dr. Deutschman) and @msh_manu (Dr. Shankar-Hari)

– Follow these key contributors on Twitter: @SCCMPresident (Dr. Dorman) and @maryloughPhD_RN (Dr. Lough)

– Follow these organizations that will offer key content: @SCCM (Society of Critical Care Medicine) and @ESICM (European Society of Intensive Care Medicine)

How do you participate?
To participate, all you need to do is tweet during the designated time using the conversation hashtags #SCCMJC and #SepsisRedefined. It’s easiest to follow and participate at www.twubs.com/SCCMJC.

Join Us for a Journal Club Twitter Chat on Sepsis Definitions

Join us on Wednesday, June 22, 2016, from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Central Time for the SCCM Social Media Task Force’s Journal Club Twitter chat on the new sepsis definitions. Special guest SCCM President Todd Dorman, MD, FCCM, will be on hand as SCCM Social Media Task Force member Mary E. Lough, CCRN, CNS, PhD, RN, moderates.

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, FCCM, a lead author on the article, The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3), and Manu Shankar-Hari, MD, MSc, also an author on Sepsis-3, will discuss and take questions via Twitter about the article.

Since its release in February by the Journal of the American Medical Association, the sepsis definitions article has been viewed more than 1 million times, making it one of the top 5% research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.

Dr. Shankar-Hari is also the lead author of Developing a New Definition and Assessing New Clinical Criteria for Septic Shock, which offers insight into the processes of the Sepsis Definitions Task Force.
These thought leaders will offer highlights for understanding Sepsis-3 and related clinical assessment, take questions via Twitter related to the material and offer additional resources. We expect robust discussion about the impact of Sepsis-3, items of clarification and thoughtful questions from the audience.

Come prepared with relevant questions and make sure to use #SCCMJC and #SepsisRedefined in your tweets.

What is a Twitter chat?
A Twitter chat is a live event on Twitter, moderated and focused around a general topic. To filter all the chatter on Twitter into a single conversation, a hashtag is used. A set time is also established.

Find your chat leaders.

– Follow these sepsis thought leaders on Twitter: @CDMD62 (Dr. Deutschman) and @msh_manu (Dr. Shankar-Hari)

– Follow these key contributors on Twitter: @SCCMPresident (Dr. Dorman) and @maryloughPhD_RN (Dr. Lough)

– Follow these organizations that will offer key content: @SCCM (Society of Critical Care Medicine) and @ESICM (European Society of Intensive Care Medicine)

How do you participate?
To participate, all you need to do is tweet during the designated time using the conversation hashtags #SCCMJC and #SepsisRedefined. It’s easiest to follow and participate at www.twubs.com/SCCMJC.

Register for Second Sepsis Redefined Webcast

Due to overwhelming interest in the original webcast, the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) will hold a second “Sepsis Redefined” webcast featuring the same content. Register today to reserve your spot on Tuesday, April 26, 2016, at 2:00 p.m. Central Time. Space is limited for this complimentary 90-minute webcast.

Moderated by Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FACS, FCCM, this webcast will feature leading sepsis experts who will discuss the recently published The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and a related response that has been provided by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). Preparation for this webcast may include review of the primary Sepsis-3 manuscript available from the Journal of the American Medical Association and the SSC statement responding to Sepsis-3.

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, FCCM, and Mitchell M. Levy, MD, MCCM, FCCP, will explore such topics as the rationale for the new definitions of sepsis and septic shock, the quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) and how this definition might apply to bedside sepsis screening.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and related clinical assessment tools
  • Recognize the rationale behind the new definitions for sepsis and septic shock
  • Understand the relationship of the new sepsis definitions to bedside screening and treatment of sepsis patients

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Keep the discussion going on Twitter by using #SepsisRedefined. Join the #SepsisRedefined conversation group for updates on upcoming Twitter Chats on this topic.

This webcast is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Registration Open for Additional Sepsis Redefined Webcast

Registration is now open for the upcoming webcast, “Sepsis Redefined,” from the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). Due to the overwhelming popularity of the original webcast, a second webcast featuring the same content will take place on Tuesday, April 26, 2016, at 2:00 p.m. Central Time for those who were unable to attend.

Moderated by Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FACS, FCCM, this webcast will feature leading sepsis experts who will discuss the recently published The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and a related response that has been provided by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). Preparation for this webcast may include review of the primary Sepsis-3 manuscript available from the Journal of the American Medical Association and the SSC statement responding to Sepsis-3.

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, FCCM, and Mitchell M. Levy, MD, MCCM, FCCP, will explore such topics as the rationale for the new definitions of sepsis and septic shock, the quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) and how this definition might apply to bedside sepsis screening.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and related clinical assessment tools
  • Recognize the rationale behind the new definitions for sepsis and septic shock
  • Understand the relationship of the new sepsis definitions to bedside screening and treatment of sepsis patients

This 90-minute webcast will take place Tuesday, April 26, 2016, at 2:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. Registration is complimentary. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Keep the discussion going on Twitter by using #SepsisRedefined. Join the #SepsisRedefined conversation group for updates on upcoming Twitter Chats on this topic.

This webcast is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Risk Factors for Readmission for Sepsis Survivors

Hospital readmission is common after sepsis, yet the relationship between the index admission and readmission remains poorly understood. Sun et al sought to examine the relationship between infection during the index acute care hospitalization and readmission and to identify potentially modifiable factors during the index sepsis hospitalization associated with readmission.

They confirmed that the majority of unplanned hospital readmissions after sepsis are due to an infection. They also found that patients with sepsis at admission who developed a hospital-acquired infection, and those who received a longer duration of antibiotics, appear to be high-risk groups for unplanned, all-cause 30-day readmissions and infection-related 30-day readmissions.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging in to the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

Registration Open for Webcast on New Sepsis Definitions

Register today for the upcoming webcast, “Sepsis Redefined,” from the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). Moderated by Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FACS, FCCM, this webcast will feature leading sepsis experts who will discuss the recently published The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and a related response that has been provided by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). Preparation for this webcast may include review of the primary Sepsis-3 manuscript available from the Journal of the American Medical Association and the SSC statement responding to Sepsis-3.

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, FCCM, and Mitchell M. Levy, MD, MCCM, FCCP, will explore such topics as the rationale for the new definitions of sepsis and septic shock, the quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) and how this definition might apply to bedside sepsis screening.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and related clinical assessment tools
  • Recognize the rationale behind the new definitions for sepsis and septic shock
  • Understand the relationship of the new sepsis definitions to bedside screening and treatment of sepsis patients

This 90-minute webcast will take place Tuesday, March 29, 2016, at 9:00 a.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. Registration is complimentary. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Keep the discussion going on Twitter by using #SepsisRedefined. Join the #SepsisRedefined conversation group for updates on upcoming Twitter Chats on this topic.

This webcast is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

VTE Incidence in Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

Prospective studies on the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) during severe sepsis and septic shock remain absent, hindering efficacy assessments regarding VTE prevention strategies in sepsis. Kaplan et al prospectively evaluated the incidence of VTE in 113 patients from three different academic medical center intensive care units (ICUs) admitted with severe sepsis or septic shock.

They identified a high incidence of VTE in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, despite the use of universal, guideline-recommended thromboprophylaxis.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging in to the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

Can Changes in Plasma Glycoproteins Predict Mortality in Severe Sepsis?

Sepsis remains a major cause of mortality in the intensive care unit. Numerous studies have attempted to elucidate the exact pathophysiology of sepsis at the cellular level, including identifying specific proteins in common pathways associated with survival. Although prior studies have had promising but limited success, the recent development and utilization of advanced genomic and proteomic databases have yielded intriguing findings that may link particular proteins and mechanisms to sepsis mortality. DeCoux et al used glycoprotein analysis to determine whether changes in plasma glycoproteins may predict mortality in severe sepsis.

This study ultimately identified proteins linked to patient outcomes and provided insight into unexplored mechanisms that can be investigated for the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging in to the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

Comparing Utility of First-Line Vasoactive Drugs in Pediatric Septic Shock

There have been many international consensus statements on the diagnosis and management of pediatric sepsis and septic shock during the past few decades. However, because of the complexity and variability in the presentation and natural course of the disease, specific recommendations regarding the ideal vasoactive agent remain controversial. Ventura et al used clinical and laboratory parameters to determine whether children with fluid-refractory septic shock would benefit more from a potent inotrope (i.e., epinephrine) than from dopamine.

Overall, the study suggested a significant benefit to using epinephrine as a first-line agent (compared to dopamine).

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging in to the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

Participate in Twitter Chat Centered on Sepsis

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is partnering with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to hold a Twitter chat aimed at raising awareness about sepsis. The chat will take place from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Central Time on Thursday, September 10, 2015. This is a great opportunity to learn about best practices for detecting and treating sepsis. It is also a great opportunity to learn about pertinent sepsis-related resources. SCCM President Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FCCM, will be fielding questions from participants throughout, so come prepared with any relevant questions you may have and make sure to use #SepsisChat in your tweets.

This Twitter chat is part of Sepsis Awareness Month, which was created to spread the word about this life-threatening condition.

GCR Expression in Critically Ill Children with Cardiovascular Dysfunction

Various efforts have been made to better understand the interplay of glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) expression and critical illness, but many unknowns remain. Shibata et al hypothesized that a subset of critically ill children with cardiovascular (CV) collapse would demonstrate decreased expression of GCR and would have more severe illness (based on Pediatric Risk of Mortality [PRISM] III measurements) and more organ failure than critically ill children with no CV collapse.

In a comparison of these two groups, the investigators discovered a statistically significant decrease in GCR expression in CD4+ and CD8+ cells in critically ill children with CV failure. They also discovered that this diminished expression could be found in patients with higher PRISM III scores and those with greater organ failure burden. Ultimately, this study’s findings suggest that the lack of GCR expression in critically ill patients could serve as a risk factor for worsening severity of illness and CV failure.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging into the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

Diastolic Dysfunction in Children with Fluid Refractory Septic Shock

The presence of cardiac dysfunction in patients with septic shock has been described for decades. However, the true prevalence or ultimate effect of diastolic dysfunction has only been described in septic children in limited fashion. Sankar et al analyzed 56 children (all between three months and 17 years of age) with fluid refractory septic shock, before inotropes or mechanical ventilation were initiated. The primary objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction in children with fluid refractory septic shock and to determine if there was an association between diastolic dysfunction and mortality.

The authors demonstrated that diastolic dysfunction in children with fluid refractory septic shock is relatively common, similar to some adult findings. Interestingly, children with diastolic dysfunction and those with no cardiac dysfunction had higher mortality rates than those with systolic dysfunction (43%, 37% and 15%, respectively), though these differences were not statistically significant. In the wake of this study, questions still linger about the true prevalence of diastolic dysfunction in children with fluid refractory septic shock. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging into the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.