Tag Archives: Project Dispatch

Register for Webcast on Preventing Surgical Fires

Register for the upcoming webcast from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch series, Surgical Fires are Preventable Medical Errors.  Held in collaboration with the Surgery Section’s Patient Safety Committee, this is the third and final session from the unique series titled “Patient Safety During Bedside Procedures in the ICU,” and is organized and moderated by Surgery Section Patient Safety Committee Co-Chair Roy Constantine, PhD, RPA-C, FCCM, Assistant Director of Mid-Level Practitioners at St. Francis Hospital – The Heart Center. Registration is complimentary.

Although preventable, hundreds of surgical fires still occur in the United States each year. During this webcast, Soham Roy, MD, FACS, FAAP, Associate Professor and Director of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, will discuss improving the surgical team’s ability to classify, assess, prevent and manage the risk of fires. The implementation of tools and practices to reinforce this safety culture will be emphasized.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify elements of the fire triangle
  • Assess high fire risk in ICU practice
  • Implement fire risk safety initiatives

This 60-minute webcast will take place Tuesday, January 12, 2016, at 1:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Project Dispatch aims to improve the quality, efficacy, accessibility and cost-effectiveness of healthcare in the United States by developing and distributing resources for critical care clinicians focused on patient-centered research. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Registration is Now Open for Webcast on Preventing Surgical Fires

Registration is now open for the upcoming webcast, “Surgical Fires Are Preventable Medical Errors,” from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch Series, held in collaboration with the Surgery Section’s Patient Safety Committee. This webcast is the third and final of a unique series titled “Patient Safety During Bedside Procedures in the ICU,” and is organized and moderated by Surgery Section Patient Safety Committee Co-Chair Roy Constantine, PhD, RPA-C, FCCM, Assistant Director of Mid-Level Practitioners at St. Francis Hospital – The Heart Center. Registration is complimentary.

According to the FDA, hundreds of surgical fires occur in the United States each year. In this webcast, Soham Roy, MD, FACS, FAAP, Associate Professor and Director of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, will discuss improving the surgical team’s ability to classify, assess, prevent and manage the risk of fires. The implementation of tools and practices to reinforce this safety culture will be emphasized.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify elements of the fire triangle
  • Assess high fire risk in ICU practice
  • Implement fire risk safety initiatives

This 60-minute webcast will take place Tuesday, January 12, 2016, at 1:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Project Dispatch aims to improve the quality, efficacy, accessibility and cost-effectiveness of healthcare in the United States by developing and distributing resources for critical care clinicians focused on patient-centered research. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Register for Webcasts on Patient Safety in the ICU

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch is offering a unique webcast series titled “Patient Safety During Bedside Procedures in the ICU.” Register today to take advantage of two upcoming learning opportunities from this series, which is held in collaboration with the Surgery Section Patient Safety Committee. These webcasts were organized and will be moderated by Surgery Section Patient Safety Committee Co-Chair Roy Constantine, PhD, RPA-C, FCCM, Assistant Director of Mid-Level Practitioners at St. Francis Hospital – The Heart Center. Registration is complimentary for both webcasts.

Patient Monitoring and the Use of Checklists During Bedside Procedures in the ICU
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Central Time
December 9, 2015
Register online

When it comes to patient safety and successful outcomes, the value of checklists is becoming more apparent in the face of a crisis. During this session, Teodoro Forcht Dagi, MD, DMedSc, MPH, FAANS, FACS, FCCM, FRCSEd, of Harvard Medical School and Queen’s University Belfast, will discuss optimization of patient monitoring and the use of checklists for crisis responses during bedside procedures in the intensive care unit (ICU). The implementation of tools and practice to reinforce this safety culture will also be emphasized.

Learning Objectives

  • Assess preparedness to respond to crises during bedside procedures
  • Implement crisis checklists in the ICU
  • Train and practice emergency response

Electronic Distraction in the ICU: An Impediment to Patient Safety
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Central Time
December 16, 2015
Register online

In this session, Peter J. Papadakos, MD, FCCM, FAARC, Director of Critical Care Medicine and Professor of Anesthesiology, Surgery, Neurology and Neurosurgery at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, will focus on limiting noise and distractions in the ICU in order to create a safer environment for the patient and the procedural team. Additional information will be provided on how electronic devices can spread infection and what can be done to avoid it. Preventable medical errors in our ICUs are associated with a culture that focuses on patient safety, and the implementation of tools and practice to reinforce this safety culture will be emphasized in this webcast.

Learning Objectives

  • Assess levels of noise and distraction in the ICU
  • Articulate how the spread of infection via electronic devices occurs

Register online for both webcasts using your Customer ID and password. For more information on both webcasts, please visit the Project Dispatch webpage. If you have any questions regarding either event, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Project Dispatch aims to improve the quality, efficacy, accessibility, and cost-effectiveness of healthcare in the United States by developing and distributing resources for critical care clinicians focused on patient-centered research. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Webcast on Early Progressive Mobility in the ICU

Register today for Early Progressive Mobility in the ICU – AACN Clinical Scene Investigator Academy Project, the latest webcast from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM’s) ICU Liberation series. It will explore the implementation of an early progressive mobility protocol by Duke Raleigh Hospital’s medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU), under the guidance of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) Clinical Scene Investigator (CSI) Academy.

The goal of this protocol was to decrease ICU lengths of stay and ventilator days, while increasing mobility and positive patient outcomes through reduced incidence of hospital-acquired infections and complications.

Implementation of the protocol has resulted in a large number of successful outcomes, a strengthened ICU team and a collaborative interprofessional culture in the unit. Presenters will discuss the team’s approach to implementation, project planning and protocol structure. They will also highlight challenges, qualitative and quantitative outcomes, and meaningful patient stories.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify different goals and strategies for successful implementation of an early progressive mobility protocol for critically ill patients, including tests of change, staff education, interprofessional collaboration, and addressing perceived barriers
  • Discuss initial and sustained outcomes and measurements resulting from the project
  • Describe how meaningful recognition and nurse leadership impact the success or failure of a project of this scale

This 60-minute webcast will take place on Tuesday, September 29, 2015, at 1:00 p.m. Central Time. Registration is complimentary for all participants.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

This webcast is held in collaboration with Project Dispatch, funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and AACN.

The ICU Liberation Initiative aims to engage clinicians in improving practice and patient outcomes related to pain, agitation, delirium, and early mobility. This webcast series examines resources and tools for implementing strategies that can help reduce the risk of long-term consequences of an ICU stay.

Register for Upcoming ICU Liberation Events

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM’s) ICU Liberation Initiative aims to engage clinicians in improving practice and patient outcomes related to pain, agitation, delirium, and early mobility. Take advantage of two upcoming learning opportunities that will provide strategies to help reduce the risk of long-term consequences of an intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Registration is complimentary. Both events are held in collaboration with Project Dispatch, funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN).

Webcast: Nurse-Driven Protocol for the Management of Alcohol and Polysubstance Abuse: AACN Clinical Scene Investigator Academy Project
September 16, 2015
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Central Time
Register online today

In September 2013, the Maimonides Medical Center’s medical ICU implemented a nurse-driven protocol for the management of patients with severe alcohol and/or substance withdrawal. The project goals included alleviating nursing staff anxiety when caring for these patients, decreasing ICU lengths of stay, reducing the number of ventilator days, and decreasing falls.

In this session, Diane Byrum, RN, MSN, CCRN, CCNS, FCCM, Manager of Quality Implementation Programs at SCCM; Laurie Wilson, RN, MSN, Senior Staff I at Maimonides Medical Center; and Christina Ycaza-Gutierrez, RN, BSN, CCRN, Senior Staff II at Maimonides Medical Center, will explore the team’s journey throughout the execution of the project and review how project implementation goals were achieved. Faculty will also discuss other positive outcomes such as decreased overall hospital lengths of stay, decreased incidence of tracheostomies, the positive impact on the hospital’s financial budget, and the project’s continued ability to surpass expected goals six months after its completion.

Learning Objectives

  • Explore the development of the project algorithm, implementation of the protocol, challenges faced, and how these challenges were overcome
  • Describe positive project outcomes and sustainability six months after project completion

Webcast: Early Progressive Mobility in the ICU: AACN Clinical Scene Investigator Academy Project
September 29, 2015
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Central Time
Register online today

Under the guidance of the AACN Clinical Scene Investigator (CSI) Academy, Duke Raleigh Hospital’s medical-surgical ICU implemented an early progressive mobility protocol. The goal was to decrease ICU lengths of stay and ventilator days while increasing mobility and positive patient outcomes through reduced incidence of hospital-acquired infections and complications. Since implementation, the unit has experienced a large number of successful outcomes and a strengthened ICU team and has created a collaborative interprofessional culture.

In this session, Cheryl L. Esbrook, OTR/L, BCPR, Program Coordinator for Occupational Therapy Professional Development at University of Chicago Medical Center; Katherine Geyer, BSN, RN, CCRN, CNIV, clinical lead to the Early Progressive Mobility in the ICU project at Duke University Health System/Duke Raleigh Hospital; and Kristin Merritt, MSN, MBA/HCM, RN, NE-BC, CCRN, Nurse Manager of Operations, Intensive Care Unit and Neuroscience Unit at Duke University Health System/Duke Raleigh Hospital, will discuss the team’s approach to implementation, project planning and protocol structure. They will also highlight challenges, qualitative and quantitative outcomes, and meaningful patient stories.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify goals and strategies for successful implementation of an early progressive mobility protocol for critically ill patients, including tests of change, staff education, interprofessional collaboration, and perceived barriers
  • Discuss initial and sustained outcomes and measurements resulting from the project
  • Describe how meaningful recognition and nurse leadership impact the success or failure of a project of this scale

If you have any questions regarding either event, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

These webcasts are held in collaboration with the AACN CSI Academy and Project Dispatch.

Project Dispatch Webcast to Explore Patient-Centered Outcomes in Brain Death

The upcoming webcast, Understanding Brain Death: From Experts to Laypersons, will explore the understanding of brain death by experts and the lay community and provide insight on how interactions with patients and families can contribute to patient-centered outcomes.

This collaborative webcast from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Emergency Medicine Section and Project Dispatch will be presented by experts Isaac Tawil, MD, FCCM, Chair of the Emergency Medicine Section and Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Intensive Care at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, and David Seder, MD, FCCM, Director of Neurocritical Care at Maine Medical Center.

Learning Objectives

  • Review medical literature on understandings of brain death among clinicians and laypersons
  • Discuss interventions to improve the understanding and clinical evaluation of brain death
  • Review the guidelines and challenges of brain death determination
  • Discuss patient-centered outcomes

This 60-minute webcast will take place on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, at 2:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. Complimentary registration is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

This webcast was organized by SCCM’s Project Dispatch in collaboration with the Emergency Medicine Section. Project Dispatch focuses on the patient and family experience. The initiative highlights a number of patient-centered care approaches to encourage awareness and adoption at the bedside among SCCM’s members. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Upcoming Webcast Will Explore Understanding of Brain Death

Registration is now open for Understanding Brain Death: From Experts to Laypersons, a collaborative webcast from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Emergency Medicine Section and Project Dispatch. During this session, Isaac Tawil, MD, FCCM, Chair of the Emergency Medicine Section and Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Intensive Care at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, and David Seder, MD, FCCM, Director of Neurocritical Care at Maine Medical Center, will explore the understanding of brain death by experts and the lay community and provide insight on how interactions with patients and families can contribute to patient-centered outcomes.

Learning Objectives

  • Review medical literature on understandings of brain death among clinicians and laypersons
  • Discuss interventions to improve the understanding and clinical evaluation of brain death
  • Review the guidelines and challenges of brain death determination
  • Discuss patient-centered outcomes

This 60-minute webcast will take place on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, at 2:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. Complimentary registration is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

This webcast was organized by SCCM’s Project Dispatch in collaboration with the Emergency Medicine Section. Project Dispatch focuses on the patient and family experience. The initiative highlights a number of patient-centered care approaches to encourage awareness and adoption at the bedside among SCCM’s members. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Project Dispatch Offers Complimentary Educational Material

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch initiative aims to put a spotlight on efforts to improve patient- and family-centered care by disseminating the latest research in this exciting field. Complimentary educational material is consequently made available with regularity. Recently released offerings include the following webcasts:

Comprehensive Patient-Centered Care in the Pediatric ICU

Patient-Centered Approach to Community Transition after Catastrophic Injury

The “Tree of Life” Memorial Event: Meaningful for Families

Collaborating with Families to Improve Patient Care and Transitions

Project Dispatch is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Webcast: Comprehensive Patient-Centered Care in the ICU

Patient- and family-centered care considers and anticipates the needs of patients and their families, all of whom are important members of the support and care team. The multidisciplinary team in a mixed medical-surgical adult intensive care unit (ICU) at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York received the ICU Design Citation award in 2009 for creation of an ICU that focuses on this approach.

On Thursday, December 11, 2014, at 12:00 p.m. Central Time, the webcast Comprehensive Patient-Centered Care in the ICU will feature the MSKCC team discussing this approach during the latest offering from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch series. Neil A. Halpern, MD, FCCM, Chief, Critical Care Medicine Service at MSKCC, will describe how his unit developed a calming, healthy, safe, and healing ICU environment by ensuring shared decision making and frequent communications with patients and families through the ICU stay to end of life. He will discuss innovative programs and technologies linked to direct patient care, such as advanced alarm management systems, early mobility programs for ventilated patients and integrative medicine consultation for bedside massage, music therapy and meditation.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the comprehensive program at MSKCC
  • Formulate plans to implement elements of the MSKCC program in the participants’ own organizations
  • Evaluate the impact these types of programs have on patient and family satisfaction

Register online today using your customer ID and password. Complimentary registration is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

This webcast was organized by SCCM’s Project Dispatch. Project Dispatch focuses on the patient and family experience. The initiative highlights a number of patient-centered care approaches to encourage awareness and adoption at the bedside among SCCM’s members. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Register for Webcast on Comprehensive Patient-Centered Care in the ICU

Registration is now open for the webcast, Comprehensive Patient-Centered Care in the ICU, the latest offering from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch series. This session will discuss how patient- and family-centered care considers and anticipates the needs of patients and their families, all of whom are important members of the support and care team. The multidisciplinary team in a mixed medical-surgical adult intensive care unit (ICU) at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York received the ICU Design Citation award in 2009 for their creation of an ICU that focuses on this approach.

In this presentation, Neil A. Halpern, MD, FCCM, Chief, Critical Care Medicine Service at MSKCC, will describe how his unit developed a calming, healthy, safe, and healing ICU environment by ensuring shared decision making and frequent communications with patients and families through the ICU stay to end of life. He will discuss innovative programs and technologies linked to direct patient care, such as advanced alarm management systems, early mobility programs for ventilated patients and integrative medicine consultation for bedside massage, music therapy and meditation.

Dr. Halpern will also review the extensive accommodations made for patients and families, as well as how the MSKCC program encompasses patients’ entire ICU experience. Some unique features include video displays to soothe patients, family members and visitors, volunteer greeters in the waiting room to help orient families and visitors to the ICU, food and coffee service, weekly multidisciplinary rounds and end-of-week conferences to discuss the full spectrum of patient and family issues, communication skills training for staff through the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, child visits, and the use of a survey to assess how patients, family members and visitors cope with a difficult situation.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the comprehensive program at MSKCC
  • Formulate plans to implement elements of the MSKCC program in the participants’ own organizations
  • Evaluate the impact these types of programs have on patient and family satisfaction

This webcast will take place on Thursday, December 11, 2014, at 12:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your customer ID and password. Complimentary registration is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

This webcast was organized by SCCM’s Project Dispatch. Project Dispatch focuses on the patient and family experience. The initiative highlights a number of patient-centered care approaches to encourage awareness and adoption at the bedside among SCCM’s members. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Webcast Next Week on Patient- and Family-Centered Care in the Pediatric ICU

Review the implementation of patient- and family-centered care practices in the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) with the webcast, Comprehensive Patient-Centered Care in the Pediatric ICU, the latest offering from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch series. In this presentation, Jason L. Adler, MD, MBA, from the Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital (JDCH) in Hollywood, Florida, USA, will discuss his unit’s implementation and the impact these practices have had on staff and the institution.

Daily bedside multidisciplinary rounds were introduced in 2006 at JDCH. During these rounds, active participation in care is sought from all who are present. This includes parents, patients, physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, social workers, and family advocates/educators. The program at JDCH has grown dramatically over the years and continues to anticipate many needs of patients and their families. It is integral to how care is provided, and the impact it has had is significant and far reaching.

Learning Objectives

  • Outline the patient- and family-centered care program at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital
  • Formulate plans to implement patient- and family-centered care programs in the participants’ own pediatric ICUs
  • Evaluate patient- and family-centered care efforts using patient satisfaction data

This webcast will take place on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, at 12:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online using your customer ID and password. Complimentary registration is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

This webcast was organized by SCCM’s Project Dispatch. Project Dispatch focuses on the patient and family experience. The initiative highlights a number of patient-centered care approaches to encourage awareness and adoption at the bedside among SCCM’s members. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Webcast: Patient-Centered Approach to Transition after Catastrophic Injury

Patients who have experienced a catastrophic injury have profound care needs and face a lifetime of risk for life-threatening medical problems. In the webcast, Patient-Centered Approach to Community Transition after Catastrophic Injury, the latest offering from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch series, the transition home and into the community for these patients will be discussed. Can a patient- and family-centered approach to education, mentoring and support be effective in minimizing hospital readmissions for these patients?

Michael Jones, PhD, FACRM, and Julie Gassaway, MS, RN, of the Shepherd Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, have received a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) grant to examine just that question. They also investigated the sense of self-sufficiency and intensity of community participation in patients with spinal cord injury. The Shepherd Center is one of only two specialty hospitals that provide rehabilitation for patients with acute brain and spinal cord injuries. In this webcast, Dr. Jones and Ms. Gassaway will share patient feedback on how the rehabilitation experience could be improved, discuss the patient- and family-centered approach to education, peer counseling, discharge planning, and support, and present preliminary results from their research. The presentation will be followed by an opportunity for audience questions.

Learning Objectives

  • Outline the challenges for patients and their families in the wake of catastrophic injury
  • Apply a patient- and family-centered approach to support the patient’s transition to home and community
  • Develop programs that benefit patients and families in the participants’ own communities

This webcast will take place on Wednesday, October 15, 2014, at 12:30 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your customer ID and password. Complimentary registration is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

This webcast was organized by SCCM’s Project Dispatch. Project Dispatch focuses on the patient and family experience. The initiative highlights a number of patient-centered care approaches to encourage awareness and adoption at the bedside among SCCM’s members. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Webcasts: “Tree of Life” Event and Transition After Catastrophic Injury

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch series will present two non-continuing medical education webcasts in the upcoming weeks.  Complimentary registration for both is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

The “Tree of Life” Memorial Event: Meaningful for Families
Wednesday, September 24, 2014
12:00 p.m. Central Time
Register Online

To honor the unselfish acts of organ donation in the face of overwhelming grief, University Hospital in San Antonio, Texas, USA, created the “Tree of Life” Memorial Event following the deaths of two young men in 2005. Both families independently decided to donate their loved ones’ organs so that something good might come from such a devastating loss. These actions started a special journey for these men’s families and the hospital staff that cared for them.

In this webcast, Charles Reed, PhD, RN, CNRN, will discuss the development of the “Tree of Life” Memorial Event, including how the program has grown and become an integral part of the hospital’s commitment to patients, their families and the community.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the “Tree of Life” Memorial Event and its impact on families and the healthcare institution
  • Examine how this program can be a model for others
  • Evaluate the impact the program has on families, staff and the community

Patient-Centered Approach to Community Transition After Catastrophic Injury
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
12:30 p.m. Central Time
Register Online

One of the greatest challenges for patients and their families after a catastrophic injury is the transition home and back into the community. These patients have profound care needs and face a lifetime of risk for developing life-threatening medical problems. Can a patient- and family-centered approach to education, mentoring and support be effective in minimizing hospital readmissions for patients?

Michael Jones, PhD, FACRM, and Julie Gassaway, MS, RN, of the Shepherd Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, have received a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) grant to examine just that question. They also investigated the sense of self-sufficiency and intensity of community participation for patients with spinal cord injury. The Shepherd Center is one of only two specialty hospitals that provide rehabilitation for patients with acute brain and spinal cord injuries. In this webcast, Dr. Jones and Ms. Gassaway will share patient feedback on how the rehabilitation experience could be improved, discuss the patient- and family-centered approach to education, peer counseling, discharge planning, and support, and present preliminary results from their research.

Learning Objectives

  • Outline the challenges for patients and their families in the wake of catastrophic injury
  • Apply a patient- and family-centered approach to support the patient’s transition to home and community
  • Develop programs that benefit patients and families in the participants’ own communities

These webcasts were organized by SCCM’s Project Dispatch. Project Dispatch focuses on the patient and family experience. The initiative highlights a number of patient-centered care approaches to encourage awareness and adoption at the bedside among SCCM’s members. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Registration Open for Webcast on “Tree of Life” Memorial Event

Registration is now open for The “Tree of Life” Memorial Event: Meaningful for Families, the latest webcast from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch series. Tragic, unexpected loss of a loved one is never easy for families, but they may honor their loved one’s wishes to help others by giving the gift of life through organ donation. In 2005, two young men with non-survivable injuries were airlifted to the surgical trauma intensive care unit at University Hospital in San Antonio, Texas, USA, starting a special journey for these men’s families and the hospital staff that cared for them. Both families independently decided to donate their loved ones’ organs so that something good might come from such a devastating loss.

To honor these unselfish acts of organ donation in the face of overwhelming grief, the hospital created the “Tree of Life“ Memorial Event, which serves as a living monument, recognizing the organ donor’s life and acknowledging the subsequent gift. The families are grateful that the hospital honors their loved ones and report that the invitation to the annual event “makes you feel good that people haven’t forgotten you.”

In this webcast, Charles Reed, PhD, RN, CNRN, will discuss the development of the “Tree of Life” Memorial Event, including how the program has grown and become an integral part of the hospital’s commitment to patients, their families and the community. Complimentary registration is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the “Tree of Life” Memorial Event and its impact on families and the healthcare institution
  • Examine how this program can be a model for others
  • Evaluate the impact the program has on families, staff and the community

This webcast will take place on Wednesday, September 24, 2014, at 1:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password.

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

This webcast was organized by the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Project Dispatch.  Project Dispatch aims to improve the quality, efficacy, accessibility, and cost-effectiveness of healthcare in the United States by developing and distributing resources for critical care clinicians focused on patient-centered research. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Project Dispatch Offers up Complimentary Educational Material

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch initiative aims to put a spotlight on efforts to improve patient- and family-centered care by disseminating the latest research in this exciting field. Complimentary educational material is consequently made available with regularity. One recently released offering centers on the efficacy of music and pet therapy in the intensive care unit.

Project Dispatch is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.