Tag Archives: guidelines

Pediatric Nutrition Support Guidelines

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) recently released guidelines addressing nutrition support therapy in the critically ill pediatric patient.

Titled “Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Pediatric Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition,” the material was published in the July 2017 issue of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.

“The guidelines offer basic recommendations that are supported by review and analysis of the current literature and a blend of expert opinion and clinical practicality,” notes lead author Nilesh M. Mehta, MD. These guidelines are intended for use by all healthcare providers involved in nutrition therapy of the critically ill child, primarily physicians, nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists.

Guideline findings include:

  • There is a significant gap in proper nutritional interventions, particularly among malnourished pediatric patients
  • Early intervention makes a difference
  • The timing and method of nutrient delivery is important
  • A skilled nutrition support team is a key differentiator
  • Ongoing monitoring is critical to avoid unintended caloric under- or overfeeding
  • Determining how much nutrition is needed is an important factor

Members and nonmembers alike can access these and other SCCM guidelines for free by visiting www.sccm.org/guidelines or by downloading the Guidelines App.

Hemodynamic Support Guidelines

The American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) recently released guidelines addressing hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock.

Titled “American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Parameters for Hemodynamic Support of Pediatric and Neonatal Septic Shock,” the material was published in the June 2017 issue of Critical Care Medicine.

This update of the 2007 ACCM guidelines is available for free download and includes major new recommendations such as the need to address hemodynamic support of septic shock at the institutional level.

Sepsis Guidelines Resources Available

The 46th Critical Care Congress announced the release of the updated Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines (available in both Critical Care Medicine and Intensive Care Medicine).

Since Congress, various new resources related to the guidelines and sepsis care have become available:

If you were unable to attend this Congress session, you can see what you missed by watching Critical Connections Live: New Guidelines for the Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock, which brings you the full session along with commentary after the broadcast. Also available are the Surviving Sepsis guidelines presentation slides.

In the newly available iCritical Care podcast SCCM Pod-336 Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines: 2016 Update, Ludwig Lin, MD, speaks with Mitchell M. Levy, MD, MCCM, about the release of the updated Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines.

Members and nonmembers alike can access the SCCM guidelines for free by downloading the Guidelines App. The new sepsis guidelines can also be found on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign App

The Society of Critical Care Medicine has endorsed the Statement on Maternal Sepsis released by the World Health Organization.

For additional resources related to the guidelines and sepsis care, check out the list below and visit www.survivingsepsis.org:

Stay Up to Date on the Latest SCCM Guidelines with Free Access

Help ensure that critical care patients are receiving consistent, evidence-based care by staying up-to-date on the latest Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) guidelines.

Members and nonmembers alike can access the SCCM guidelines for free by visiting www.sccm.org/guidelines and Critical Care Medicine online or by downloading the Guidelines App.

SCCM’s guidelines cover a variety of topics including family-centered care, sustained neuromuscular blockade, reversal of antithrombotics in intracranial hemorrhage, and the management of sepsis and septic shock. View the complete list online.

Updated Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines

Updated Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines (available in both Critical Care Medicine and Intensive Care Medicine) were released during the 46th Critical Care Congress, along with a viewpoint and synopsis published in JAMA. Materials are available at www.survivingsepsis.org.

Affiliated materials released in conjunction with the guidelines include:

– A Users’ Guide to the 2016 Surviving Sepsis Guidelines
Critical Care Medicine
Intensive Care Medicine

– Surviving Sepsis Guidelines: A Continuous Move Toward Better Care of Patients With Sepsis
JAMA Viewpoint

Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock
JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis

Practice guidelines as implementation science: the journal editorsʼ perspective
Critical Care Medicine
Intensive Care Medicine

Video: Comparison of recommendations from 2012 to 2016

Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2016 is a joint collaboration between the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

The guidelines, developed by a consensus committee of 55 international experts in sepsis, offer important advancements for clinicians caring for patients with sepsis and septic shock, starting with the need to identify at-risk patients sooner.

Keep the conversation going about the new sepsis guidelines by using #SCCMLive. You can also view video of the Congress session during which the guidelines were presented, which featured Laura E. Evans, MD, FCCM, Andrew Rhodes, FRCP, FRCA, FFICM, and Mitchell M. Levy, MD, MCCM, FCCP. The video also includes a session debrief with Lauren Epstein, MD, and R. Phillip Dellinger, MD, MCCM.

SCCM Releases Bedside Cardiac Ultrasound Guidelines

The Society of Critical Care Medicine recently released guidelines addressing bedside cardiac ultrasound.

Titled “Guidelines for the Appropriate Use of Bedside General and Cardiac Ultrasonography in the Evaluation of Critically Ill Patients—Part II: Cardiac Ultrasonography,” the material was published in the June 2016 issue of Critical Care Medicine.

After reviewing the document, you’re encouraged to revisit “Guidelines for the Appropriate Use of Bedside General and Cardiac Ultrasonography in the Evaluation of Critically Ill Patients—Part I: General Ultrasonography,” which was released in the November 2015 issue of Critical Care Medicine.

SCCM Releases Guidelines Addressing Nutrition in Critically Ill

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) recently released guidelines addressing the provision and assessment of nutrition support therapy in the adult critically ill patient.

Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.)

On a separate note, the Society also recently released a policy statement addressing shared decision making in intensive care units.

Shared Decision Making in ICUs: An American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society Policy Statement

SCCM Releases Critical Care Ultrasonography Guidelines

The Society of Critical Care Medicine recently released guidelines addressing critical care ultrasonography.

Titled “Guidelines for the Appropriate Use of Bedside General and Cardiac Ultrasonography in the Evaluation of Critically Ill Patients—Part I: General Ultrasonography,” the material was published in the November 2015 issue of Critical Care Medicine.

After reviewing the document, you’re encouraged to listen to an in-depth iCritical Care podcast that discusses the nuances of the guidelines.

SCCM Pod-296 Guidelines for the Appropriate Use of Bedside General and Cardiac Ultrasonography

International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Seeking Input

The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) seeks to finalize systematic evidence evaluations for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC), relevant to the critical care community. ILCOR is using an online public commenting process (www.ilcor.org) and seeks important input from general members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. The American Heart Association, in collaboration with ILCOR, is seeking public comment about scientific evidence evaluation questions that will be used to develop the 2015 guidelines, anticipated to be published on October 15, 2015.

Over 80 clinical and education questions and draft recommendations on a variety of resuscitation topics are now posted for review on ILCOR’s Scientific Evidence Evaluation and Review System at ILCOR.org/SEERS. More will be posted in the coming days. Public comments will be accepted through February 28. Each question posted focuses on a specific resuscitation topic and includes scientific evidence from relevant, peer-reviewed journals.

A number of topics are of high interest to the critical care community, including:

• Induced Hypothermia and Targeted Temperature Management
• Oxygen Dose after Return of Circulation
• Percutaneous Coronary Intervention after Return of Circulation
• Prognostication after Cardiac Arrest when Therapeutic Hypothermia Has Been Implemented

ILCOR’s Consensus on Science with Treatment Recommendations (CoSTR) is scheduled for online publication in the journal Circulation on October 15, 2015. Based in part on CoSTR, the 2015 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC will be published on the same date.

As key stakeholders in critical care and resuscitation, ILCOR encourages you and your peers to visit ILCOR.org/SEERS and to participate in the CoSTR public comment process.

ICU Liberation Releases Informative Presentations

The ICU Liberation initiative is focused on providing tools and resources to assess, treat and prevent pain, agitation and delirium (PAD). The following presentations — delivered at the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s 43rd Critical Care Congress — feature leaders from the initiative discussing the nuances of PAD guideline implementation and strategies for improving patient outcomes. In addition, one of the presentations features a patient sharing his intensive care unit survivor experience.

Remember to regularly check the ICU Liberation YouTube playlist for the latest available presentations.

Surviving Sepsis, ICU Liberation Offer Guidelines in Numerous Languages

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s American College of Critical Care Medicine offers numerous guidelines to help ensure consistent, evidence-based care of critical care patients using the most up-to-date and relevant knowledge available.

The most recent guidelines released relate to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and the ICU Liberation initiative. Both initiatives are dedicated to improving care worldwide, with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign aimed at reducing sepsis mortality and ICU Liberation focused on providing tools and resources to assess, treat and prevent pain, agitation and delirium (PAD). These guidelines have been translated into various languages to ensure worldwide distribution.

ICU Liberation (PAD Guidelines)

Japanese Guidelines Translation

Surviving Sepsis Campaign (2012 Guidelines)

Chinese Guidelines Translation

French Guidelines Translation

German Guidelines Translation

Japanese Guidelines Translation

Persian Guidelines Translation

Portuguese Guidelines Translation

Spanish Guidelines Translation

AHA Survey Seeks Critical Care Input

The American Heart Association (AHA) is preparing to revise its 2010 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation  and emergency cardiovascular care. The AHA’s Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee has identified members of the critical care community as key stakeholders in this process. Please participate in this brief survey to provide feedback that may be used to craft the 2015 guidelines.

Parenteral Nutrition Safety Recommendations Published

To address the parenteral nutrition safety gaps and improve patient protections, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) has published a comprehensive set of recommendations in the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition for improving the safety of parenteral nutrition. This article is open access.

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) has recently collaborated with A.S.P.E.N. on a nutrition guideline titled Recommendations for Changes in Commercially Available Parenteral Multivitamin and Multi – Trace Element Products.