Tag Archives: Disaster and Emergency Response

Earthquake in Southern Asia

The Society of Critical Care Medicine extends its deepest condolences to all those affected by the devastating earthquake that recently struck southern Asia. At this time, there is no call for critical care volunteers, but the Society will be closely monitoring the situation.

Please note that the Society maintains a website with various emergency response resources at www.sccm.org/disaster. You’re encouraged to visit this site to access pertinent disaster-related resources.

For general information about disaster preparedness, learn more about the Society’s Fundamental Disaster Management (FDM) program. Also, visit LearnICU.org/Disaster for additional disaster resources, including these FDM sample chapters:

Intensive Care Unit Microcosm Within Disaster Medical Response

Disaster Preparation for the Critical Care Provider—Setting the Stage

What Matters? The Role of an ICU During Disaster

Volunteers Sought for Nepal Relief Efforts

Pediatric Universal Life-Saving Effort, a nonprofit organization, is seeking individuals for volunteer efforts in Nepal. If you’re interested, fill out and submit the applicable form. The organization is also raising funds for the Nepal relief efforts. Society members are encouraged to donate.

As a reminder, the Society maintains a website with various emergency response resources at www.sccm.org/disaster. The SCCM Disaster eCommunity site also has a thread specific to the situation in Nepal. This is a great forum for sharing pertinent resources and information.

If you have not already, you are encouraged to listen to the recent iCritical Care podcast centering on post-disaster efforts in Nepal. Donation opportunities are also discussed.

SCCM Pod-272 Tragedy in Nepal: Post-Disaster Efforts, Ways to Help

In this podcast, Margaret Parker, MD, MCCM, speaks with Laura Hawryluck, MD, FRCPC, about Nepal’s critical care infrastructure and how it has been affected by the earthquake. They also discuss the post-disaster efforts and ways the critical care community can help. As noted in the podcast, those interested in contributing to the Nepal Critical Care Development Foundation can find more information at http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nepal-icu-care-box. The Society has contributed to the relief efforts in this manner and encourages its members to do likewise as they are inclined and able. For additional information, contact Dr. Hawryluck at laura.hawryluck@gmail.com. Dr. Hawryluck works as a critical care physician at the University Health Network in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Tragedy in Nepal: Disaster Resources, Ways to Donate

On behalf of its membership, the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) has reached out to those affected by the devastating earthquake and avalanche in Nepal, offering our deepest condolences and assistance in response efforts.

The Society maintains a website with various emergency response resources at www.sccm.org/disaster. There is also a thread on the SCCM Disaster eCommunity site specific to the situation in Nepal. This is a great forum for sharing pertinent resources and information.

At this time, there is no call for critical care volunteers, but the Society will continue to communicate with those in the affected region and do everything possible to assist in the effort. To learn more about critical care development in Nepal and ways to donate to relief efforts, please visit www.nccdfnepal.org. To the many SCCM members who have already contacted our headquarters offering to go to Nepal, thank you. And to those that have chosen to assist through other means, your efforts are very much appreciated and admired by your colleagues worldwide.

You are encouraged to listen to the recent iCritical Care podcast centering on post-disaster efforts in Nepal. Donation opportunities are also discussed.

SCCM Pod-272 Tragedy in Nepal: Post-Disaster Efforts, Ways to Help

In this podcast, Margaret Parker, MD, MCCM, speaks with Laura Hawryluck, MD, FRCPC, about Nepal’s critical care infrastructure and how it has been affected by the earthquake. They also discuss the post-disaster efforts and ways the critical care community can help. As noted in the podcast, those interested in contributing to the Nepal Critical Care Development Foundation can find more information at http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nepal-icu-care-box. The Society has contributed to the relief efforts in this manner and encourages its members to do likewise as they are inclined and able. For additional information, contact Dr. Hawryluck at laura.hawryluck@gmail.com. Dr. Hawryluck works as a critical care physician at the University Health Network in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Pediatric Universal Life-Saving Effort, a nonprofit organization, is also raising funds for the Nepal relief efforts. Society members are encouraged to donate.

Care of the Child with Ebola Virus Disease

You are encouraged to check out a timely and important article entitled “Care of the Child with Ebola Virus Disease,” which appears in the February 2015 issue of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. The article provides clinicians with practical considerations for the care of children with Ebola virus disease in resource-rich settings.

The Society of Critical Care Medicine continues to actively monitor the Ebola outbreak and provide pertinent information to the critical care community. A variety of resources are available at www.sccm.org/disaster.

SCCM Continues to Provide a Variety of Ebola-Related Resources

During the recent annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians, late-breaking sessions were held in collaboration with the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and featured personal protective equipment (PPE) demonstrations. Content was drawn from SCCM’s Fundamental Disaster Management program. This joint effort was intended to better prepare health professionals who may soon manage the treatment of patients exposed to the Ebola virus.

SCCM continues to actively monitor the Ebola outbreak and will continue to provide pertinent information to the critical care community. A variety of resources are available at www.sccm.org/disaster, including new Ebola guidelines for emergency departments, which were recently published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The guidelines establish consistency for emergency care workers and reflect lessons learned thus far in the fight against Ebola.

SCCM also recently released an iCritical Care podcast in which Margaret Parker, MD, MCCM, speaks with SCCM President-Elect Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FCCM, and Jay Varkey, MD, about the Ebola epidemic and how clinicians should be preparing for emerging infections. Dr. Varkey was on a team of clinicians at Emory University Hospital who successfully treated an American missionary and doctor infected with the Ebola virus.

SCCM Pod-242 Preparing for Emerging Infections

Finally, SCCM also recently made available the following Ebola protocols from Baylor Scott & White Health:

Ebola Mandatory Protocol – Screening PPE

Ebola Mandatory Protocol – Observer Role

Ebola Mandatory Protocol – Treatment PPE for Healthcare Worker and Coach

To share valuable Ebola-related resources akin to those enumerated above, visit the Society’s Disaster eCommunity. This forum is an excellent venue offering insight and any recent developments.

New iCritical Care Podcast Centers on Ebola Outbreak

In a recently released iCritical Care podcast, Margaret Parker, MD, MCCM, speaks with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) President-Elect Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FCCM, and Jay Varkey, MD, about the Ebola epidemic and how clinicians should be preparing for emerging infections. Dr. Varkey was on a team of clinicians at Emory University Hospital who successfully treated an American missionary and doctor infected with the Ebola virus.

SCCM Pod-242 Preparing for Emerging Infections

SCCM is monitoring the Ebola outbreak and will continue to provide pertinent information to the critical care community, such as this link to resources and articles centered on the Ebola epidemic recently made available by The New England Journal of Medicine.

Visit www.sccm.org/disaster for additional resources and the latest news related to the Ebola response.

Responding to the Ebola Outbreak

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), together with its non-government organization (NGO) partners, is reaching out to clinical medical personnel to help control and end the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Finding experienced healthcare workers to provide clinical services in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — the countries hardest hit by Ebola — remains a significant challenge in the response effort. USAID has created a website to coordinate a volunteer response.  On the site, volunteers may register their interest in going to West Africa to staff clinics and provide healthcare to patients with Ebola. Volunteer information is made available to NGO partners, who will contact volunteers directly about terms of service, clinical opportunities, Ebola safety training, and possible deployment.

The Ebola crisis in West Africa is rapidly worsening. The disease is spreading into densely populated urban areas, and public health leaders from the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other organizations are warning that the outbreak is progressing to a generalized epidemic.

The Society of Critical Care Medicine continues to monitor the outbreak and has posted a Hospital Checklist for Ebola Preparedness. Visit www.sccm.org/disaster for resources and news related to the Ebola response.

Exchange Ideas and Resources in SCCM’s Disaster eCommunity

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is poised to respond to natural and man-made disasters and emergencies by providing a variety of resources to the critical care community. One such resource is the Society’s eCommunity, which has a forum dedicated to disaster response.

Interested parties are encouraged to visit this forum to share valuable resources or offer insight on a variety of disaster-related topics, including the recent Ebola outbreak. You can subscribe to the Disaster eCommunity to stay abreast of recent postings.