Tag Archives: Critical Care Medicine

Journals Rank High Among Critical Care Resources

The Society of Critical Care Medicine extends its congratulations and thanks to Critical Care Medicine editor-in-chief Timothy G. Buchman, PhD, MD, MCCM, and Pediatric Critical Care Medicine editor-in-chief Patrick Kochanek, MD, MCCM, as well as to the editorial boards and staff of both journals on maintaining their standings among critical care journals. Critical Care Medicine received a 2014 impact factor of 6.312 and an immediacy index (an indicator of how quickly articles are cited) of 2.572, ranking 4th of 27 journals in critical care medicine. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine received a 2014 impact factor of 2.338, with an immediacy index of 1.192, and ranks 28th among pediatric journals and 14th among all critical care journals.

Critical Care Telemedicine: Evolution and State of the Art

An intensive care unit (ICU) telemedicine program is a practical way to increase access as well as to reduce mortality rates and length of stay, according to a review in the November issue of Critical Care Medicine.

Critical Care Telemedicine: Evolution and State of the Art” summarizes the results of numerous telemedicine studies, reviewing the growth and current penetration of ICU telemedicine programs, their associated outcomes and their impact on medical education. The review also identifies program revenue sources and costs and regulatory aspects.

Proposals for further advancing the field are provided in an editorial by Jeremy Khan, MD, MS.

Developed with input from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Tele-ICU Committee, led by Craig M. Lilly, MD, FCCM, the review calls urgently for comparative effectiveness studies. Dr. Lilly has tied telemedicine to current events, noting how such tools have been used to help manage high-risk Ebola patients by limiting room entries, by allowing for consultation without infectious exposure and by facilitating patient communication with family and friends.

SCCM resources related to telemedicine are available in the Administration Knowledge Line of LearnICU.org. In past issues, Critical Connections has featured two articles on the topic: “Should Critical Care Training Programs Start Offering Formal Training in Tele-ICU?” and “All Eyes on the ICU – Telemedicine.”

Discover Clinical Breakthroughs During Congress

Learn about clinical breakthroughs and advances in patient care during the stimulating discussions of educational symposia. Each session is presented by leading experts in critical care and offers a thorough analysis of the developments and issues affecting most intensive care unit (ICU)  environments. These sessions are complimentary for all Congress registrants, and no additional registration is needed to attend.

Strategies to Optimize Physical and Psychological Functioning in the ICU Patient
(Supported by an educational grant from Hospira)
Review the impact of pain, sedation and delirium on ICU patients, discuss mobility options for ICU patients and identify strategies for successful guideline implementation.

The Continuing Adaptation of MRSA: The Impact on Critical Care
(Supported by an educational grant from Cubist Pharmaceuticals)
Explore the clinical implications of recent changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as a pathogenic organism and the impact on patient outcomes.

Hyponatremia in the Critical Care Patient: First Do No Harm
(Supported by an educational grant from Otsuka America Pharmaceuticals, Inc.)
Identify the risks of decreased sodium levels in the neurological ICU patient, list treatment options for hyponatremia and discuss how to improve outcomes.

Targeted Therapies for Invasive Fungal Infections: Are You Missing the Mark?
(Supported by an educational grant from Astellas)
Discuss emerging data on the epidemiology of Candida, non-Candida and mucormycoses infections in the ICU and review the data on current and emerging therapies for invasive fungal infections.

These symposia will be held on Saturday, January 11, 2014, during the 43rd Critical Care Congress.  Seating is on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Register online for Congress today using your Customer ID and password, or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

2014 Award for Excellence in Medication-Use Safety

The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Foundation is accepting applications for the 2014 Award for Excellence in Medication-Use Safety. This award, funded by the Cardinal Health Foundation, recognizes the efforts of a pharmacist-led multidisciplinary team that has implemented medication safety improvements into its hospital or health system. Five criteria will be used to evaluate all candidates for this $50,000 award, including: scope of the medication-use system initiative, pharmacist leadership, planning and implementation, measurable outcomes and impact, and innovation and generalizability.

The winner and other finalists will be recognized at an awards ceremony and during the Opening General Session of the 2014 ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting in Anaheim, California, USA. The winning organization&#39s accomplishments will be communicated to national pharmacy trade press and consumer media, and a representative will take part in a media outreach event during the 2015 National Patient Safety Week.

For more information, please visit www.excellenceinmeduse.org.

The Society of Critical Care Medicine and its Creative Community members provide various resources aimed at addressing the latest and most pressing issues facing critical care practitioners including drug shortages. The  Drug Shortage Task Force delivers information on the safe and consistent management of shortages as well as Drug Shortage Alerts.

Do You Know Your SCCM Engagement Score?

SCCMGaugeThe SCCM Engagement Index dashboard quantifies how engaged you are with SCCM. It represents your activity level with the Society, including years of continuous membership, products ordered, conferences attended and volunteer services on various committees.

The dashboard is located at mysccm.org. Log in using your username and password, and find your engagement score below your profile. The more engaged you are with your  Society, the higher your score. Start increasing your score today!

Webcasts to Discuss Patient Distress and Pediatric Transfusion

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) will offer two non-CME webcasts in the month of November. These webcasts are complimentary for all participants. If you have questions regarding these webcasts, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Reducing Distress Among Critical Illness Survivors sq-Quality-Project-Dispatch v1_0
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
12:00 p.m. Central Time (view additional time zones)
Register online today.

Nearly 800,000 Americans receive mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit  each year. In this webcast from the Project Dispatch series, Christopher Ethan Cox, MD, MPH, and his team explore a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded study and explain which of two treatments is more effective in reducing psychological distress and improving quality of life.

Made possible through a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), SCCM’s Project Dispatch aims to improve the quality, effectiveness, accessibility, and cost-effectiveness of healthcare in the United States by developing and distributing resources for critical care clinicians focused on patient-centered research.

Transfusing the Critically Ill Child: It&#39s Not Like Giving Them Kool-Aid  sq-Congress
Thursday, November 14, 2013
1:00 p.m. Central Time (view additional time zones)
Register online today.

More than 22 million units of blood are transfused in the United States annually, and understanding the risk/benefit ratio is essential. In this webcast, part of an ongoing educational effort to provide the latest information on transfusion practices  to the critical care community, Philip Spinella, MD, FCCM, Howard Corwin, MD, FCCM, Joshua Salvin, MD, MPH, and Paul Checchia, MD, FCCM, will address transfusing the critically ill child. A follow-up intermediate session on the same topic will be held at the 2014 Critical Care Congress.

Does Sodium Bicarbonate Prevent Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery?

Up to 50% of all patients requiring cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery develop acute renal failure, with less than 5% requiring renal replacement therapy. Consequently, post-cardiac surgery acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In the July Critical Care Medicine, McGuinness and colleagues designed a multicenter Phase IIb trial to test the hypothesis that a perioperative infusion of sodium bicarbonate might attenuate AKI in cardiac surgery patients. Read more…

Journals Rank High Among Critical Care Resources

PCCM CCMThe Society of Critical Care Medicine extends its congratulations and thanks to Critical Care Medicine editor-in-chief Joseph E. Parrillo, MD, MCCM, and Pediatric Critical Care Medicine editor Patrick Kochanek, MD, MCCM, as well as to the editorial boards and staff involved in both journals on maintaining their standings among critical care journals. CCM received a 2012 impact factor of 6.124 and an immediacy index of 2.614, maintaining its position as the premier peer-reviewed journal in critical care medicine. PCCM received a 2012 impact factor of 2.354, with an immediacy index (an indicator of how quickly articles are cited) of 1.093 (an increase compared with last year’s 0.937), it now ranks 26th among pediatric journals and 14th among all critical care journals.

Read the Journals on Your iPad

Read CCM and PCCM whenever and wherever it’s convenient for you. Both journal iPad apps offer a print-like reading experience plus article-sharing features, website links and more. Search “Critical Care Medicine” or “Pediatric Critical Care Medicine” in the iTunes store.