Register for ECMO Management Course

Registration is open for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) ECMO Management course. Explore the basic management principles common to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) programs for both adult and pediatric patients in this intense two-day simulation course.

Receive a comprehensive overview of ECMO programs while rotating through lectures and simulation scenarios. Each simulation group will have a maximum ratio of six participants to one facilitator.

This course will be held September 29 and 30, 2016, at the University of Arizona Center for Simulation and Innovation in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, in partnership with the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization.

Register online today with your Customer ID and password or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

2016 Editions of Current Concepts in Adult and Pediatric Critical Care Available

Each year, the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) popular Congress precourses, Current Concepts in Adult Critical Care and Current Concepts in Pediatric Critical Care, deliver the latest clinical information relevant to patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). These courses are now available On Demand and the companion textbooks are available in print and as eBooks.

Save over 10% by purchasing the Adult or Pediatric bundle, which include the 2016 book and unlimited access to the On Demand course.

The 2016 version of Current Concepts in Adult Critical Care features the following topics:

  • Decoding Patient Safety and Quality in the ICU
  • Emerging Infectious Diseases
  • Management of the Burn-Injured Patient
  • Emergency Airway Management

The 2016 version of Current Concepts in Pediatric Critical Care features the following topics:

  • Updates on New and Cutting-Edge Approaches to Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Tracheostomies in the Pediatric ICU
  • Choice of Ventilator Mode in the Pediatric ICU

All of the Current Concepts resources are available for purchase. Visit www.sccm.org/AdultCC or www.sccm.org/PediatricCC. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Registration Open for Additional Sepsis Redefined Webcast

Registration is now open for the upcoming webcast, “Sepsis Redefined,” from the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). Due to the overwhelming popularity of the original webcast, a second webcast featuring the same content will take place on Tuesday, April 26, 2016, at 2:00 p.m. Central Time for those who were unable to attend.

Moderated by Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FACS, FCCM, this webcast will feature leading sepsis experts who will discuss the recently published The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and a related response that has been provided by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). Preparation for this webcast may include review of the primary Sepsis-3 manuscript available from the Journal of the American Medical Association and the SSC statement responding to Sepsis-3.

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, FCCM, and Mitchell M. Levy, MD, MCCM, FCCP, will explore such topics as the rationale for the new definitions of sepsis and septic shock, the quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) and how this definition might apply to bedside sepsis screening.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and related clinical assessment tools
  • Recognize the rationale behind the new definitions for sepsis and septic shock
  • Understand the relationship of the new sepsis definitions to bedside screening and treatment of sepsis patients

This 90-minute webcast will take place Tuesday, April 26, 2016, at 2:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. Registration is complimentary. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Keep the discussion going on Twitter by using #SepsisRedefined. Join the #SepsisRedefined conversation group for updates on upcoming Twitter Chats on this topic.

This webcast is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Risk Factors for Readmission for Sepsis Survivors

Hospital readmission is common after sepsis, yet the relationship between the index admission and readmission remains poorly understood. Sun et al sought to examine the relationship between infection during the index acute care hospitalization and readmission and to identify potentially modifiable factors during the index sepsis hospitalization associated with readmission.

They confirmed that the majority of unplanned hospital readmissions after sepsis are due to an infection. They also found that patients with sepsis at admission who developed a hospital-acquired infection, and those who received a longer duration of antibiotics, appear to be high-risk groups for unplanned, all-cause 30-day readmissions and infection-related 30-day readmissions.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging in to the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

New Video Series Centers on Patient-Centered Rounds Using ABCDEF Bundle

You are encouraged to watch a new ICU Liberation video series, Patient-Centered Rounds Using the ABCDEF Bundle.

The scenarios presented in these videos—showing integration of the ABCDEF Bundle during patient care rounds—are intended to start a dialogue among interprofessional teams about relevant implementation and communication practices.

Patient-Centered Rounds Using the ABCDEF Bundle: Video 1

Patient-Centered Rounds Using the ABCDEF Bundle: Video 2

Patient-Centered Rounds Using the ABCDEF Bundle: Video 3

An accompanying facilitator’s guide for the video series is also available:

Patient-Centered Rounds Using the ABCDEF Bundle: Facilitator Guide for the Video Series

Application Deadline Tomorrow for THRIVE Support Group Network Funding

In support of the THRIVE initiative, the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is proud to fund the second round of seed grants to foster an international network of in-person support groups linking survivors of critical illness and their families. These groups will offer survivors mutual support and the opportunity to share solutions to the challenges of recovery after an intensive care unit (ICU) stay.

Via a brief, expedited application process, SCCM will select five new sites to join the collaborative. Participation is open to institutions that already have a support group in place, as well as those that wish to establish a new support system for patients. Participants will join together in regular calls to share knowledge about nurturing such groups and helping them grow. The goal of these grants is not to fund ICU follow-up clinics but rather to develop peer-support models with strong survivor co-leadership as the foundation for growing an international network.

Applications are due June 17, 2016.

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM staff partner Adair Andrews at aandrews@sccm.org.

Also, learn more about post-intensive care syndrome and the efficacy of peer support groups by reading an informative peer-reviewed article that recently appeared in Advanced Critical Care.

Surviving Sepsis Campaign Releases Statement on New Sepsis Definitions

In a series of articles published last month in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and released during the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 45th Critical Care Congress, an international task force updated the definitions of sepsis and septic shock. The group’s recommendations not only advance new definitions for sepsis and septic shock, but also offer clinical guidance to help physicians more quickly identify patients with, or at risk of, sepsis.

Since its release, The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3), has been viewed more than 660,000 times. The article scored highest among outputs of a similar age from JAMA and is among one of the top 5% research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric. Learn more about this article’s Altmetric scores.

Clarifications from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign

In light of the new definitions, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC), a joint collaboration of SCCM and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine committed to reducing mortality from severe sepsis and septic shock worldwide, issued a statement with important clarifications:

“For hospitals who have prepared for the transition, screening for early identification and treatment of patients with sepsis (formerly called severe sepsis) should continue essentially as has been previously recommended by SSC,” according to the statement.

The Campaign goes on to restate its recommendations for 1) screening and management of infection, 2) screening for organ dysfunction and management of sepsis (formerly called severe sepsis) and 3) identification and management of initial hypotension.

The Campaign also offers this clarification for practitioners regarding the quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA): “Sepsis-3 introduces qSOFA as a tool for identifying patients at risk of sepsis with a higher risk of hospital death or prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay both inside and outside critical care units,” the authors note.

The Campaign notes the following two points:

  • qSOFA does not define sepsis (but the presence of two qSOFA criteria is a predictor of both increased mortality and ICU stays of more than three days in non-ICU patients)
  • The new sepsis definitions recommend using a change in baseline of the total SOFA score of two or more points to represent organ dysfunction

Additional Resources

The Society has curated numerous resources related to the sepsis definitions at www.sccm.org/sepsisredefined. Among these resources are:

  • The full presentation (video and PowerPoint slides) from the 45th Critical Care Congress that unveils the sepsis definitions
  • A presentation (video and PowerPoint slides) from the 45th Critical Care Congress that focuses on how to use the new definitions
  • Two different iCritical Care podcast interviews—one featuring Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FCCM, and a follow-up with Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, FCCM
  • Accompanying articles by Seymour et al and Angus et al published in Critical Care Medicine, which present conceptual frameworks to help patients, clinicians, researchers and hospitals apply the new definitions
  • An informative Medscape article centered on the updated definitions of sepsis and septic shock

Keep the discussion going on Twitter by using #SepsisRedefined. Join the #SepsisRedefined conversation group for updates on upcoming Twitter Chats on this topic.

45th Critical Care Congress On Demand Is Now Available

Now you can experience the stimulating educational content from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 45th Critical Care Congress as if you were there.

Congress On Demand provides access to the audio recordings and slides from hundreds of individual presentations drawn from the concurrent, joint and plenary educational sessions, as well as the symposia, at the 2016 Critical Care Congress in Orlando, Florida, USA. It is the next best thing from attending the live event. Once you’ve purchased Congress On Demand, you can access the materials as often as you like by logging into MySCCM.org.

Congress On Demand is available for purchase in the SCCM store. The purchase price is just $295 for SCCM members and $385 for nonmembers.

Additionally, many of the precourses are available for purchase. These include:

Bring the Congress educational experience to your home or office. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Save the Date for the 2017 Congress!
The 2017 Critical Care Congress will be held January 21 to 25, 2017, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. This five-day event will bring together more than 6,000 members of the critical care community and will feature internationally renowned faculty and content sessions highlighting the most up-to-date, evidence-based developments in critical care medicine. Registration opens June 2016.

Award Winning ICU Designs, 2016 Edition, Available

The new 2016 edition of Award Winning ICU Designs is now available. Functional intensive care unit (ICU) design is crucial to delivering quality critical care. To honor the best examples of such design, an annual awards program is co-sponsored by the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, and the American Institute of Architects Academy of Architecture for Health.

This interactive web-based program contains the top projects since 1992, with each project reviewed in short video segments. The companion PDF document contains features and floor plans of each winning unit. Also included is the Society’s “Guidelines for Intensive Care Unit Design” and a preface from former Co-Chair Dan R. Thompson, MD, MA, FACP, FCCM. This product provides a complete, contemporary resource for creating a facility that fulfills the needs of both ICU patients and caregivers.

To purchase Award Winning ICU Designs, 2016 edition, visit the SCCM Store. This product is available to SCCM members for $200 and to nonmembers for $260. This product expires two years from the date of purchase.

Please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888 with any questions.

Registration Open for the Summer Critical Care Ultrasound Courses

Registration is now open for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Critical Care Ultrasound courses. The summer 2016 ultrasound courses will be held at a new location: the Loews Chicago O’Hare Hotel in Rosemont, Illinois, USA. Rosemont offers the convenience and amenities of downtown Chicago but at a lower price, and it’s just minutes from O’Hare International Airport.

Focused ultrasound examinations in the critical care setting have become an extension of the clinical assessment because of their rapid, precise detection capabilities. Assist in the immediate management of patients by learning or enhancing point-of-care skills during these popular courses.

Obtain the realistic training needed to perform and interpret ultrasound imaging with the comprehensive, two-day Critical Care Ultrasound or Critical Care Ultrasound – Pediatric courses, which will be held July 16 to 17, 2016. During each course, participants benefit from guided, focused skill stations and interactive presentations to reinforce key learning points. Extensive faculty coverage ensures a significant hands-on experience for each participant.

Expand your fundamental echocardiographic skills and knowledge with the one-day Advanced Critical Care Ultrasound or Advanced Critical Care Ultrasound – Pediatric course, which will be held on July 18, 2016. These courses will focus on the specialty-specific use of echocardiography in the management of the critically ill patient, and participants will explore the noninvasive management of the hemodynamically unstable patient.

These courses are expected to sell out early. Register online for Critical Care Ultrasound, Critical Care Ultrasound – Pediatric, Advanced Critical Care Ultrasound, and Advanced Critical Care Ultrasound – Pediatric using your customer ID and password, or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Registration Open for Webcast on New Sepsis Definitions

Register today for the upcoming webcast, “Sepsis Redefined,” from the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). Moderated by Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FACS, FCCM, this webcast will feature leading sepsis experts who will discuss the recently published The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and a related response that has been provided by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). Preparation for this webcast may include review of the primary Sepsis-3 manuscript available from the Journal of the American Medical Association and the SSC statement responding to Sepsis-3.

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, FCCM, and Mitchell M. Levy, MD, MCCM, FCCP, will explore such topics as the rationale for the new definitions of sepsis and septic shock, the quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) and how this definition might apply to bedside sepsis screening.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) and related clinical assessment tools
  • Recognize the rationale behind the new definitions for sepsis and septic shock
  • Understand the relationship of the new sepsis definitions to bedside screening and treatment of sepsis patients

This 90-minute webcast will take place Tuesday, March 29, 2016, at 9:00 a.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password. Registration is complimentary. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Keep the discussion going on Twitter by using #SepsisRedefined. Join the #SepsisRedefined conversation group for updates on upcoming Twitter Chats on this topic.

This webcast is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Impact of Initial CVP on Outcomes of Fluid Management Strategies in ARDS

In acute respiratory distress syndrome, conservative fluid management increases ventilator-free days without affecting mortality. Response to fluid management may differ based on patients’ initial central venous pressure. Semler et al hypothesized that initial central venous pressure would modify the effect of fluid management on outcomes.

They found that conservative fluid management decreases mortality for acute respiratory distress syndrome patients with a low initial central venous pressure.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging in to the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

SCCM Collaborative to Focus on Improving Patient- and Family-Centered Care

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is launching a new collaborative aimed at helping hospitals implement patient and family engagement programs.

The Society is seeking intensive care unit (ICU) teams interested in participating in the PCOR-ICU Collaborative: Improving Care for Critically Ill Patients and Families Through Research Dissemination and Implementation. This program is funded through a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Award (2626-SCCM).

Visit www.sccm.org/PCOR to learn more about the application process.

Led by SCCM Executive Committee members Ruth M. Kleinpell, PhD, RN-CS, FAAN, FCCM, and Jerry J. Zimmerman, MD, PhD, FCCM, the PCOR-ICU Collaborative will bring together ICU teams to implement patient- and family-centered initiatives.

The Society is seeking 50 ICU teams based in the United States to participate. Adult and pediatric ICUs will be considered.

Potential initiatives will include:

  • Implementing open visitation (non-restricted ICU hours)
  • Integrating families in rounds (family-centered rounds)
  • Integrating structured family care conferences to establish goals of care
  • Disseminating information and providing support to families on how they can assist with the care of their loved one
  • Family presence during invasive procedures in the ICU
  • Family presence during resuscitation
  • Forming a family/patient advisory group
  • Implementing music therapy in the ICU setting
  • Implementing pet therapy in the ICU setting
  • Facilitating the use of patient/family ICU diaries
  • Investigation and planning for implementation of a post-ICU clinic
  • Project of team’s choice related to patient- and family-centered outcomes

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) is an independent, nonprofit organization authorized by Congress in 2010. Its mission is to fund research that will provide patients, their caregivers, and clinicians with the evidence-based information needed to make better-informed healthcare decisions. PCORI is committed to continually seeking input from a broad range of stakeholders to guide its work.

Severe Influenza-Associated Critical Illness Prompts CDC Health Advisory

Influenza activity is increasing across the country and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has received reports of severe influenza illness.

Since October 2015, the CDC has detected co-circulation of influenza A(H3N2), A(H1N1)pdm09, and influenza B viruses. However, H1N1pdm09 viruses have predominated in recent weeks. The CDC has issued a Health Advisory urging rapid antiviral treatment of very ill and high-risk suspect influenza patients without waiting for testing.

The CDC has received recent reports of severe respiratory illness among young- to middle-aged adults with H1N1pdm09 virus infection, some of whom required intensive care unit admission. Fatalities have been reported. Some of these patients reportedly tested negative for influenza by RIDT (rapid influenza diagnostic test); their influenza diagnosis was made later with molecular assays. Most of these patients were reportedly unvaccinated. H1N1pdm09 virus infection in the past has caused severe illness in some children and young- and middle-aged adults.

In response to this cluster of cases, mostly reported in Arizona, the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group has published a comprehensive review of the salient epidemiologic, diagnostic and therapeutic features that have been learned from the experience with influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in adults.

Clinicians should continue efforts to vaccinate patients this season for as long as influenza viruses are circulating, and they should promptly start antiviral treatment of severely ill and high-risk patients if influenza is suspected or confirmed.

Keep up to date on influenza with the CDC’s weekly surveillance reports:

Weekly Reports
Weekly Summary

Visit www.sccm.org/disaster for additional influenza resources.

New Sepsis Definitions Published in JAMA and Highlighted at Congress

In a series of articles published last month in JAMA and released during the 45th Critical Care Congress, an international task force updated definitions of sepsis and septic shock. The group’s recommendations not only advance new definitions for sepsis and septic shock, but also offer clinical guidance to help physicians more quickly identify patients with or at risk of developing sepsis.

At present, The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3), has more than 560,000 views, making it one of the best viewed JAMA articles of all time.

Accompanying articles by Seymour et al and Angus et al published in Critical Care Medicine also present a conceptual framework to help patients, clinicians, researchers and hospitals apply the new definitions. The Society has also released SCCM Pod-311 New Sepsis Definitions: An In-Depth Interview with Craig Coopersmith to help give context to the new definitions.

“This is an incredibly exciting time in the field of sepsis,” said Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FCCM, a task force member and immediate past president of the Society. “Driven by a combination of data analysis on well over one million patients as well as expert consensus, these new definitions provide a real step forward.”

The task force definitions were directly informed by research out of the Clinical Research, Investigation, and Systems Modeling of Acute illness (CRISMA) Center at the Pitt School of Medicine and were funded in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health. They were sponsored by more than 30 organizations representing a variety of professionals who manage and diagnose sepsis.

Visit www.sccm.org/sepsisredefined for a complete list of resources and articles. Also, make sure to read this informative Medscape article centered on the updated definitions of sepsis and septic shock.

Keep the discussion on Twitter going by using #SepsisRedefined. Join the #SepsisRedefined conversation group for updates on upcoming Twitter Chats on this topic.

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