Join the CDC in Marking Sepsis Awareness Month

September is Sepsis Awareness Month, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is sponsoring and/or promoting numerous events to stress the importance of detecting this life-threatening condition early and taking preventative measures.

All events to be held in September dovetail nicely with a Vital Signs report released by the CDC late last month that centered on sepsis. The release of the report coincided with a related press conference held by the CDC that featured CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden and Mitchell Levy, MD, MCCM, FCCP, a founding and Executive Committee member of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, discussing the report and emphasizing the importance of early identification.

Events in September include:

The 1st World Sepsis Congress – Thursday, September 8 and Friday, September 9
In 13 distinctive sessions, more than 70 speakers from more than 20 countries will give 10-minute keynotes and presentations on the number one preventable cause of death worldwide: sepsis. After each talk, the speakers will answer live questions from the audience.

Twitter Chat Centered on Sepsis – Tuesday, September 13, at 12:00 p.m. (CT)
The chat will feature Dr. Richard Besser of ABC News discussing sepsis. Dr. Richard Besser is the Chief Health and Medical Editor for ABC News. To participate, use #abcDrBchat.

CDC Webinar – Advances in Sepsis: Protecting Patients Throughout the Lifespan – Tuesday, September 13, at 2:00 p.m. (CT)

CDC Webinar – Empowering Nurses for Early Sepsis Recognition – Thursday, September 22, at 1:00 p.m. (CT)

Before, during and after the above events, you are encouraged to keep the conversation going on social media by using the following hashtag: #ThinkSepsis.

If you have not already done so, you are also encouraged to review resources related to the new sepsis definitions released earlier this year and to familiarize yourself with the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Surviving Sepsis Campaign and its THRIVE initiative, which centers on addressing post-intensive care syndrome (PICS).

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