Critical eConnections SCCM.org
SCCM.org  |   My SCCM  |   Learn ICU  |   Patients & Families

September 4, 2014

Concise Critical Appraisal

Is Tidal Volume Associated with Mortality in Mechanically Ventilated Children?
Incidence of Subdural Hemorrhage in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

Education

Webcast: Patient-Centered Approach to Transition after Catastrophic Injury
Earn CME/CE Credit with the 2014 Congress Review
Register Now for a Critical Care Ultrasound Course
Registration Open for Webcast on “Tree of Life” Memorial Event
Palliative Sedation in the ICU On Demand Is Now Available

SCCM News

Responding to the Ebola Outbreak
SCCM Releases Presentations Centered on Improving Care and Patient Safety
Mitchell Levy Featured in CDC Expert Commentary Series Discussing Sepsis
Fosphenytoin Injection Drug Shortage Alert
Incidence of Subdural Hemorrhage in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

Subdural hemorrhage (SDH) in infants is commonly associated with nonaccidental trauma and “shaken baby syndrome,” and some reports suggest that SDH may appear in susceptible infants who have suffered apnea or significant hypoxia. Although generally asymptomatic, SDH related to birth trauma has also been reported to be common. Kelly and colleagues sought to determine the true incidence of SDH in infancy by looking at pre- and postoperative infants who have undergone a repair of congenital heart disease (CHD). In addition, the authors sought an association between the development of SDH and the presence of hypoxia.

The authors found that asymptomatic SDH was common in infants with CHD at a rate similar to those without CHD. These SDHs were typically small and resolved within three months of birth. The authors were unable to demonstrate any association between hypoxia and SDH in this cohort. However, the ability to generalize these results is limited due to the nature of the selected patient population.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging into the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

Tags: , |
Back to Top
Is Tidal Volume Associated with Mortality in Mechanically Ventilated Children?

Since the landmark articles by the ARDS Network in 1998 and 2000, low tidal volume (Vt) ventilation in critically ill adults has become a standard intervention to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury. However, despite the lack of confirmatory data in critically ill children, the practice of using low Vt has been readily adopted in most — if not all — mechanically ventilated pediatric patients. This systematic review by de Jager et al attempted to find an association between various cutoff values for Vt and mortality in mechanically ventilated patients younger than 18 years. The authors searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL for randomized clinical trials and observational studies, ultimately analyzing eight studies.

A relationship between Vt and mortality in mechanically ventilated children could not be identified, irrespective of the severity of disease. The reasons for this are multifactorial. Most importantly, the authors admit to significant heterogeneity among the pooled studies, which clearly affected their ability to demonstrate any association between Vt and mortality.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging into the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

Tags: , |
Back to Top
Webcast: Patient-Centered Approach to Transition after Catastrophic Injury

Patients who have experienced a catastrophic injury have profound care needs and face a lifetime of risk for life-threatening medical problems. In the webcast, Patient-Centered Approach to Community Transition after Catastrophic Injury, the latest offering from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch series, the transition home and into the community for these patients will be discussed. Can a patient- and family-centered approach to education, mentoring and support be effective in minimizing hospital readmissions for these patients?

Michael Jones, PhD, FACRM, and Julie Gassaway, MS, RN, of the Shepherd Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, have received a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) grant to examine just that question. They also investigated the sense of self-sufficiency and intensity of community participation in patients with spinal cord injury. The Shepherd Center is one of only two specialty hospitals that provide rehabilitation for patients with acute brain and spinal cord injuries. In this webcast, Dr. Jones and Ms. Gassaway will share patient feedback on how the rehabilitation experience could be improved, discuss the patient- and family-centered approach to education, peer counseling, discharge planning, and support, and present preliminary results from their research. The presentation will be followed by an opportunity for audience questions.

Learning Objectives

  • Outline the challenges for patients and their families in the wake of catastrophic injury
  • Apply a patient- and family-centered approach to support the patient’s transition to home and community
  • Develop programs that benefit patients and families in the participants’ own communities

This webcast will take place on Wednesday, October 15, 2014, at 12:30 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your customer ID and password. Complimentary registration is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

This webcast was organized by SCCM’s Project Dispatch. Project Dispatch focuses on the patient and family experience. The initiative highlights a number of patient-centered care approaches to encourage awareness and adoption at the bedside among SCCM’s members. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Tags: |
Back to Top
Earn CME/CE Credit with the 2014 Congress Review

Earn continuing medical education/continuing education credit with the 2014 Congress Review, now available in the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) store. This complimentary online course reviews key presentations from the 43rd Critical Care Congress held in San Francisco, California, USA.

Supported by education grants from Hospira, Inc. and Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc., the sessions for this course include:

  • Strategies to Optimize Physical and Psychological Functioning in the ICU Patient
  • Hyponatremia in the Critical Care Patient: First Do No Harm
  • Pediatric Acute Lung Injury
  • Late Breaker: The Latest in Critical Care Research
  • Drug Shortages: Lessons Learned

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Discuss the risks and treatment options for a critically ill patient with hyponatremia
  • Discuss strategies to decrease the impact of pain, sedation and delirium on ICU patients
  • Review consensus criteria and treatment options for pediatric acute lung injury
  • Define how demand elasticity encourages overutilization in the ICU
  • Discuss the impact of drug shortages on patient outcomes

To participate in this activity, purchase this free course from the SCCM store. After earning a passing score of 70% or higher on the post-test, you will be eligible to claim credit for this activity.

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Tags: , |
Back to Top
Registration Open for Webcast on “Tree of Life” Memorial Event

Registration is now open for The “Tree of Life” Memorial Event: Meaningful for Families, the latest webcast from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Project Dispatch series. Tragic, unexpected loss of a loved one is never easy for families, but they may honor their loved one’s wishes to help others by giving the gift of life through organ donation. In 2005, two young men with non-survivable injuries were airlifted to the surgical trauma intensive care unit at University Hospital in San Antonio, Texas, USA, starting a special journey for these men’s families and the hospital staff that cared for them. Both families independently decided to donate their loved ones’ organs so that something good might come from such a devastating loss.

To honor these unselfish acts of organ donation in the face of overwhelming grief, the hospital created the “Tree of Life“ Memorial Event, which serves as a living monument, recognizing the organ donor’s life and acknowledging the subsequent gift. The families are grateful that the hospital honors their loved ones and report that the invitation to the annual event “makes you feel good that people haven’t forgotten you.”

In this webcast, Charles Reed, PhD, RN, CNRN, will discuss the development of the “Tree of Life” Memorial Event, including how the program has grown and become an integral part of the hospital’s commitment to patients, their families and the community. Complimentary registration is made possible by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the “Tree of Life” Memorial Event and its impact on families and the healthcare institution
  • Examine how this program can be a model for others
  • Evaluate the impact the program has on families, staff and the community

This webcast will take place on Wednesday, September 24, 2014, at 1:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today using your Customer ID and password.

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

This webcast was organized by the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Project Dispatch.  Project Dispatch aims to improve the quality, efficacy, accessibility, and cost-effectiveness of healthcare in the United States by developing and distributing resources for critical care clinicians focused on patient-centered research. This project is supported by grant number R18HS21940 from AHRQ. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of AHRQ.

Tags: |
Back to Top
Register Now for a Critical Care Ultrasound Course

Focused ultrasound examinations in the critical care setting have become an extension of the clinical assessment because of their rapid, precise detection capabilities. Assist in the immediate management of patients by learning or enhancing point-of-care ultrasound skills.

Obtain the realistic training needed to perform and interpret ultrasound imaging with the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s comprehensive, two-day Critical Care Ultrasound or Critical Care Ultrasound – Pediatric course. In each, participants benefit from guided, focused skill stations and interactive presentations to reinforce key learning points. Extensive faculty coverage ensures a significant hands-on experience for each participant.

The ultrasound courses will be held January 21 and 22, 2015, at the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. For further details and to register, visit the ultrasound courses Web page.

Tags: , , |
Back to Top
Palliative Sedation in the ICU On Demand Is Now Available

The recently broadcast Palliative Sedation in the ICU webcast is now available for purchase On Demand.

In this webcast from the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Controversies in Critical Care series, Douglas B. White, MD, begins by introducing the topic of palliative sedation. Expert faculty then explore when and under what conditions such treatment is warranted and what types of sedation regimens are included under this rubric. Margaret L. Campbell, PhD, RN, FPCN, discusses clinical considerations for use of palliative sedation in the ICU, and Mark Siegel, MD, reviews the ethical foundations and potential pitfalls with this form of sedation.

Palliative Sedation in the ICU On Demand gives you access to videos containing both slides and lectures from every session in a searchable format, making it the next best thing to attending the live event. Once you’ve purchased Palliative Sedation in the ICU On Demand, you can access the materials as often as you like by logging into www.MySCCM.org.

Palliative Sedation in the ICU On Demand is available for purchase in the SCCM store.  The registration rate is just $35 for members ($45 for nonmembers).

If you participated in the live event, your subscription to the On Demand service was included in your registration fee. The materials can be accessed by logging into www.MySCCM.org with your customer ID and password.

The Controversies in Critical Care webcast series is a joint project of the SCCM Scientific Review Committee and the American College of Critical Care Medicine’s Ethics Committee. This series is intended to provide insight into topics in critical care medicine for which there is no clear consensus or unequivocal evidence for guiding practice decisions.

Tags: , , |
Back to Top
Responding to the Ebola Outbreak

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), together with its non-government organization (NGO) partners, is reaching out to clinical medical personnel to help control and end the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Finding experienced healthcare workers to provide clinical services in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — the countries hardest hit by Ebola — remains a significant challenge in the response effort. USAID has created a website to coordinate a volunteer response.  On the site, volunteers may register their interest in going to West Africa to staff clinics and provide healthcare to patients with Ebola. Volunteer information is made available to NGO partners, who will contact volunteers directly about terms of service, clinical opportunities, Ebola safety training, and possible deployment.

The Ebola crisis in West Africa is rapidly worsening. The disease is spreading into densely populated urban areas, and public health leaders from the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other organizations are warning that the outbreak is progressing to a generalized epidemic.

The Society of Critical Care Medicine continues to monitor the outbreak and has posted a Hospital Checklist for Ebola Preparedness. Visit www.sccm.org/disaster for resources and news related to the Ebola response.

Tags: , |
Back to Top
SCCM Releases Presentations Centered on Improving Care and Patient Safety

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Quality and Safety Committee has just released several presentations on improving care and patient safety. Check out all five informative offerings, each of which features expert insight from an SCCM member.

  • The Line is In, Now What? Prevention is the Key
  • Transitioning Patients Between Care Providers: Demonstration
  • Transitioning Patients Between Care Providers: Presentation
  • Step by Step: Building a Process Improvement Initiative in Your ICU
  • Let’s Get Moving: Patient Mobilization in the ICU

Remember to regularly check www.LearnICU.org/Quality for the latest available presentations.

Tags: , |
Back to Top
Mitchell Levy Featured in CDC Expert Commentary Series Discussing Sepsis

Mitchell Levy, MD, FCCP, FCCM, 2012 co-chair of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines Committee, recently recorded a video for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in which he discusses the latest Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines and associated care bundles.

Recorded as part of the CDC Expert Commentary series — a joint collaboration of the CDC and Medscape — the video features Dr. Levy describing the efficacy of evidence-based care bundles. He also details SSC resources designed to aid guideline implementation efforts.

To learn more about these resources and the Campaign’s overall mission, visit www.survivingsepsis.org.

Also, a new CDC website has been created to increase sepsis awareness and improve early recognition, diagnosis and treatment. The site puts a spotlight on the many resources made available by the Campaign.

Tags: , |
Back to Top
Fosphenytoin Injection Drug Shortage Alert

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Drug Shortages Task Force has developed a comprehensive guide for responding to the current fosphenytoin shortage.

The Fosphenytoin Injection Drug Shortage Alert provides pertinent information on the shortage’s impact in adult and pediatric patients. It also details related management strategies, pharmacotherapeutic considerations and safety considerations. Alternatives for fosphenytoin — such as phenytoin injection — are listed and analyzed.

Visit www.sccm.org/currentissues to access all Drug Shortage Alerts, including those addressing:

  • Alternative Medications for Procedural Sedation
  • Electrolyte Medication Shortages
  • Intravenous Sodium Bicarbonate
  • Web Resources
  • Intravenous Loop Diuretics
  • General Considerations
Tags: |
Back to Top

Click here for free CME/CE

© Society of Critical Care Medicine
Headquarters: 500 Midway Drive | Mount Prospect, Illinois 60056 USA
Phone: +1 847 827-6869 | Fax: +1 847 827-6886
Manage your communication preferences or unsubscribe.