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October 3, 2013

Concise Critical Appraisal

Is Remote Ischemic Postconditioning Cardioprotective in Children Undergoing Cardiac Surgery?

Education

Webcast to Discuss the Surviving Sepsis Campaign as a Model for Mentoring
Meet at the Intersection of Technology and Medicine

SCCM News

Additional Incentives Tied to Maintenance of Certification Activities
Help SCCM Understand Your Educational Needs
Is Remote Ischemic Postconditioning Cardioprotective in Children Undergoing Cardiac Surgery?

Children who undergo cardiac surgery may suffer predictable systemic inflammatory responses, myocardial depression, and pulmonary endothelial dysfunction, all related to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). One therapeutic strategy to prevent these injuries involves remote ischemic preconditioning (RIC), whereby a remote organ (usually a limb) is made repeatedly ischemic and then reperfused over a short period before the more significant IR insult (like cardiac surgery). This practice has been shown to modify the expression of key proteins in cytokine synthesis and leukocyte trafficking. Cheung et al demonstrated that RIC, applied prior to the initiation of CPB, provided some myocardial protection in children who underwent cardiac surgery.

In the August issue of Pediatric Anesthesia Zhong et al applied the same principles, though the timing of ischemia was different. The authors recruited 69 subjects (35 in the control group and 34 in the ischemic group) between the ages of 3 and 12 years who underwent repair of their congenital heart diseases. Remote ischemia was achieved by inflating a blood pressure cuff located on a lower limb to a pressure of 200 mm Hg for 5 minutes, followed by deflation for 5 minutes; this was repeated for a total of 3 cycles. These maneuvers were performed after the aorta was unclamped. The primary endpoint the maneuver’s effect on cardiac troponin I levels over 24 hours. Secondary endpoints included clinical outcomes, adverse cardiac events and changes in other metabolic markers such as neuron-specific enolase. Read more…

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Webcast to Discuss the Surviving Sepsis Campaign as a Model for Mentoring

SSC LogoThe latest offering from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) webcast series, The SSC as a Model for Mentoring, will be held on Tuesday, October 15, 2013. The Physician Assistant (PA) Section of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) will share examples of prime mentoring activities from the SSC. Presentations from the viewpoints of the mentee, mentor, and an objective educator will set the stage for participants to implement a mentoring program that can provide significant professional growth for all involved while furthering the reach of the SSC. Presenters include Ryan O’Gowan, MBA, PA-C, FCCM, from St. Vincent’s Hospital, Mari Mullen, MD, from the University of Massachusetts, and Emanuel P. Rivers, BS, MD, MPH, IOM, from Henry Ford Hospital.

During this webcast, faculty will:

  • Describe the role of mentor and mentee in a healthcare setting
  • Explain the benefits of serving as a mentor
  • Outline goals for a mentoring relationship using the SSC as a model

The SSC as a Model for Mentoring webcast will be held at 1:00 p.m. Central Time (view additional time zones).

Register online today. If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at
+1 847 827-6888.

Previous webcasts and related educational slide presentations are also available on a variety of topics.

Moore

This webcast series is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

 

More than 700 sites have enrolled for the SCC’s International Multicentre PREvalence Study on Sepsis (IMPRESS). Help us reach our goal of 1000 sites and enroll today! De-identified patient-level data will be collected on patients with severe sepsis or septic shock presenting to a participating intensive care unit (ICU) or emergency department within a 24-hour period, midnight to midnight on November 7, 2013. Data collected as part of routine clinical care, including hospital and ICU characteristics, patient characteristics, severity of illness, adherence to SSC bundle elements, and mortality, will be used for this study.

The SSC listserv has topped 2,100 members. Join and be part of the discussion!

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Meet at the Intersection of Technology and Medicine

Experience the City by the Bay at the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 43rd Critical Care Congress, to be held January 9 to 13, 2014, in San Francisco, California, USA. This five-day event will offer opportunities to connect with colleagues from around the globe and participate in valuable programming, including:

  • Cutting-edge educational sessions
  • Hands-on workshops
  • Compelling plenary sessions
  • Captivating symposia
  • One-of-a-kind multiprofessional networking

When the right people come together in one place, ideas become reality. Join nearly 5,000 critical care clinicians at the 2014 Congress, where creative and inspirational ideas for the critical care field will be developed and shared. Regardless of your profession or role in the critical care team, you will find opportunities to enhance your practice. Register today.

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Additional Incentives Tied to Maintenance of Certification Activities

The American Board of Surgery (ABS) has been approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) for the 2013 Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) MOC Incentive. This incentive allows physicians participating in PQRS reporting to earn an additional 0.5% on Medicare Part B charges by also participating in an approved Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program “more frequently” than what is required to maintain board certification. Surgeons must also participate in a patient experience of care survey to earn the incentive.

Surgeons not yet enrolled in the ABS MOC Program must pass a recertification exam in 2013 to be eligible. Even if certified by more than one board of the American Board of Medical Specialties , participants cannot receive more than one MOC incentive payment.

For more information about PQRS reporting, visit www.cms.gov/pqrs.

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Help SCCM Understand Your Educational Needs

The Society of Critical Care Medicine is conducting its semi-annual educational needs assessment survey.  This five-minute survey has been streamlined to be respectful of your time and to help us best identify your needs. Participation will give you an important opportunity to help shape the future of the Society’s educational programming. The Society is dedicated to ensuring excellence and consistency in the practice of critical care, and understanding your educational needs is vital to this pursuit.

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