Critical eConnections SCCM.org
SCCM.org  |   My SCCM  |   Learn ICU  |   Patients & Families

October 17, 2013

Concise Critical Appraisal

Is Thoracic Ultrasound an Alternative to Conventional Imaging?

Education

Webcasts on Sepsis Data Tool, Systems Engineering, Pediatric Transfusion, and Patient Distress
Registration Open for 2014 MCCKAP Exam

SCCM News

Surviving Sepsis Campaign Update: Start Collecting Data, Join a Local Collaborative
New Resources Highlight Post-Intensive Care Syndrome
Is Thoracic Ultrasound an Alternative to Conventional Imaging?

Ultrasound has particular usefulness in the critical care setting, with well-established applications for line placement and echocardiography. Questions remain regarding the validity of replacing traditional adjuncts with ultrasound. A previous Concise Critical Appraisal noted that thoracic ultrasound has been shown to be comparable to chest radiographs. In this review by Ashton-Cleary from Royal Cornwall Hospital in the United Kingdom, evidence is reviewed to evaluate the usefulness of thoracic ultrasound in the ICU.

MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane’s CENTRAL databases were searched as well as the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register for relevant articles between 1995 and 2012. Eighty-eight articles of relevance were identified. The review specifically focused on ultrasound and comparative ability to detect or quantitate four common thoracic conditions in critical care: pleural effusion, consolidation, pulmonary edema, and pneumothorax. In each of the included studies, ultrasound was performed by physicians who were described explicitly or implicitly as having training and experience in the skill. Diagnostic measures for the four conditions were tabulated and included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, diagnostic accuracy, and area under the curve (AUC).

Read more…

Tags:
Back to Top
Webcasts on Sepsis Data Tool, Systems Engineering, Pediatric Transfusion, and Patient Distress

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) will offer four non-CME webcasts in the months of October and November. These webcasts are complimentary for all participants. If you have questions regarding these webcasts, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Using the New Surviving Sepsis Campaign Collection Tool

SSC LogoCollection and analysis of data from bundle compliance is crucial to the success of improvement efforts in the care of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Learn to use the new data collection tool efficiently and effectively in your institution with instruction from the primary designer and member of the SSC leadership, Christa Schorr, RN, MSN. Using screen shots of the new resource, Ms. Schorr will explain how it differs from the previous database, illustrate how users can download and install it locally, and demonstrate how participating facilities can generate reports. A question and answer session will follow her presentation. This webcast will be held October 21, 2013, at 12:00 p.m. Central Time (view additional time zones). This webcast is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.
Moore

 

 

Septic Shock Case Study: Acute Management of the Morbidly Obese Patient

SSC LogoMorbidly obese patients have unique needs in the emergency department and ICU. In this latest offering from the SSC webcast series, Tiffany Osborn, MD, MPH, will present a case study in which she offers insight into best practices for treating the morbidly obese patient with septic shock. This webcast will be held on Wednesday, November 6, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. Central Time (view additional time zones). This webcast is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Moore

ICU Systems Engineering

sq-CongressA systems approach, as well as systems engineering principles and best practices, can foster continuous improvement in the safety and quality of care delivered to ICU patients while lowering the total costs. During the ICU Systems Engineering webcast, Peter J. Pronovost, MD, PhD, Adam Sapirstein, MD, Alan Ravitz, and Doug Solomon, PhD, MPH, will discuss improving ICU care through a systems approach and systems engineering principles. This webcast will take place on Friday, November 8, 2013, at 12:00 p.m. Central Time (view additional time zones). An intermediate session on the same topic will be held at the 2014 Critical Care Congress.

Reducing Distress Among Critical Illness Survivors

sq-Quality-Project-Dispatch v1_0Nearly 800,000 Americans receive mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure in the ICU each year. In this webcast from the Project Dispatch series, Christopher Ethan Cox, MD, MPH, and his team explore a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded study and explain which of two treatments is more effective in reducing psychological distress and improving quality of life. This webcast will take place on Tuesday, November 12, 2013, at 12:00 p.m. Central Time (view additional time zones).

Made possible through a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), SCCM’s Project Dispatch aims to improve the quality, effectiveness, accessibility, and cost-effectiveness of healthcare in the United States by developing and distributing resources for critical care clinicians focused on patient-centered research.

Transfusing the Critically Ill Child: It’s Not Like Giving Them Kool-Aid 

sq-CongressMore than 22 million units of blood are transfused in the United States annually, and understanding the risk/benefit ratio is essential. In this webcast, part of an ongoing educational effort to provide the latest information on transfusion to the critical care community, Philip Spinella, MD, FCCM, Howard Corwin, MD, FCCM, Joshua Salvin, MD, MPH, and Paul Checchia, MD, FCCM, will address transfusing the critically ill child. This webcast will take place on Thursday, November 14, 2013, at 1:00 p.m. Central Time (view additional time zones). A follow-up intermediate session on the same topic will be held at the 2014 Critical Care Congress.

Tags: ,
Back to Top
Registration Open for 2014 MCCKAP Exam

Registration is now open for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 2014 Multidisciplinary Critical Care Knowledge Assessment Program (MCCKAP), to be administered exclusively online February 27 to March 7, 2014.

Register by November 27, 2013, to take advantage of discounted registration rates.

The MCCKAP online exam assesses critical care fellowship programs nationally. Held every spring, the MCCKAP exam helps program directors:

  • Prepare fellows for the subspecialty board examinations in critical care
  • Identify specific areas of strength and weakness with lists of references and key terms for missed questions
  • Assess results for each individual fellow and the overall program as well as the institution’s national ranking
  • Review preliminary scores and analysis immediately upon completion of the test

Available in both adult and pediatric formats, the exam is offered exclusively online and consists of 200 multiple-choice questions pertaining to critical care knowledge and patient management. Exam content is developed by critical care professionals experienced in exam preparation and analysis.

Register online using your Customer ID and password, or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Tags: , ,
Back to Top
Surviving Sepsis Campaign Update: Start Collecting Data, Join a Local Collaborative

SSC LogoThe Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) is launching a quality improvement initiative to increase early recognition and treatment of sepsis in patients on hospital medical, surgical and telemetry units. It is seeking hospitals to participate in collaboratives in San Francisco, Chicago and the East Coast (meeting in Providence, RI).

The aim of this new initiative is to study, test and disseminate tools related to the early identification and treatment of sepsis on hospital floors. Participating hospitals will select one unit to enroll in this pilot project. During the course of the collaborative hospitals that experience significant improvements may choose to implement changes in other units outside the collaborative. At the end of the collaborative, a consensus statement will be produced along with change/tool packages free to hospitals across the world interested in improving their own care.

The SSC Collaborative initiative is made possible through a generous grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to continue the work of the SSC in the United States. There is no fee to join the collaborative. The Foundation’s support covers the costs of the faculty, collaborative project management, database support and benchmarking, virtual meeting support and other related expenses.

Apply to be part of the SSC collaboratives and learn more about the participation criteria and leading faculty. Applications are due by November 15, 2013.

The SSC Data Collection Tool is Now Available
Hospitals worldwide are encouraged to download the free data collection tool to improve the care of sepsis patient worldwide. Collecting data helps improve outcomes and inform benchmarking data. Hospital seeking to download the Data Collection Tool should seek the help of their Information Technology Department. A webcast detailing the data collection tool will be held October 21, 2013, at 12:00 p.m. Central Time.

Tags: ,
Back to Top
New Resources Highlight Post-Intensive Care Syndrome

The Society of Critical Care Medicine has developed several resources for clinicians and patients related to post-intensive care syndrome.

Post-intensive care syndrome, or PICS, is made up of health problems that remain after critical illness. They are present when the patient is in the ICU and may persist after the patient returns home. These problems can involve the patient’s body, thoughts, feelings, or mind and may affect the family. PICS may show up as an easily noticed drawn-out muscle weakness, known as ICU-acquired weakness; as problems with thinking and judgment, called cognitive (brain) dysfunction; and as other mental health problems.

Learn more by exploring these resources:

Tags:
Back to Top