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October 16, 2014

Concise Critical Appraisal

Does Colchicine Prevent Atrial Fibrillation and PPS After Cardiac Surgery?
Reduced Microstrain and Improved Alveolar Recruitment Using APRV

Education

Help Shape the Future of Critical Care Medicine
Registration Now Open for 2015 MCCKAP

Emergency Preparedness

New iCritical Care Podcast Centers on Ebola Outbreak

SCCM News

SSC Releases Updated Statement in Response to ProCESS and ARISE Trials
Does Colchicine Prevent Atrial Fibrillation and PPS After Cardiac Surgery?

Due to its ability to actively disrupt microtubules, attenuate neutrophil activation and reduce inflammation, oral colchicine is a potentially promising agent for reducing morbidity after cardiac surgery. Imazio and investigators from the COPPS-2 (Colchicine for Prevention of the Postpericardiotomy Syndrome and Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation) study group attempted to determine the efficacy and safety of colchicine to reduce postpericardiotomy syndrome (PPS), postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) and postoperative pericardial/pleural effusion. The subjects in the study were patients undergoing cardiac surgery drawn from 11 Italian centers.

Colchicine was found to reduce the incidence of PPS, but did not reduce postoperative AF or postoperative pericardial/pleural effusion. However, the ability to generalize these results is limited due to the nature of the selected patient population.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging into the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

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Reduced Microstrain and Improved Alveolar Recruitment Using APRV

Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) exacerbates acute lung injury by causing additional atelectrauma and volutrauma at the microanatomical level. Kollisch-Singule and colleagues designed a randomized, nonblinded laboratory animal study to investigate alveolar microstrain of subpleural alveoli during dynamic inflation and deflation. The authors hypothesized that airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), with a prolonged plateau pressure (Phigh) and minimal time at end-expiratory release pressure (Plow), would minimize microstrain.

The authors found that an APRV termination of peak expiratory flow rate to peak expiratory flow rate ratio of 75% resulted in significantly less alveolar microstrain and improved alveolar recruitment. The methodology established in this study will likely prove useful in future large animal and clinical studies designed to investigate the optimal mechanical breath profiles for the prevention of VILI.

Read the full Concise Critical Appraisal by logging into the SCCM eCommunity. Concise Critical Appraisal is a regular feature aimed at highlighting the best and most relevant literature from a variety of academic journals and encouraging discussion around recent studies and research.

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Help Shape the Future of Critical Care Medicine

Learn about new developments and tools to help expand your knowledge and advance your practice of critical care at the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 44th Critical Care Congress, to be held January 17 to 21, 2015, in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. The Congress Advance Program is now available.

This five-day event will offer opportunities to make valuable connections and draw diverse perspectives from all members of the multiprofessional critical care team. Participate in cutting-edge educational sessions, hands-on workshops, captivating symposia, and popular plenary sessions promoting innovative developments in critical care.

Plenary sessions are given by distinguished, world-renowned leaders in the critical care field. Speakers include:

Margaret Dempsey Clapp, RPH, MS, MDiv
Signature-Healthcare
Brockton, Massachusetts, USA

R. Phillip Dellinger, MD, MSc, MCCM
Professor and Chair, Department of Medicine
Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
Chief Medicine Service and Medical Director
Adult Health Care Institute
Senior Critical Care Attending
Cooper University Health Care
Camden, New Jersey, USA

Dorrie Fontaine, RN, PhD, FAAN
Dean of the School of Nursing
Sadie Heath Cabaniss Professor of Nursing
Associate Chief Nursing Officer at the University of Virginia Health System
University of Virginia School of Nursing
Charlottesville, Virginia, USA

Jorge Hidalgo, MD, MACP, FCCP, FCCM
Professor of Critical Care
Chief, Division of Critical Care
Karl Heusner Memorial Hospital
Member, Board of the Under the Water Science and Scientific Diving
University of Belize
Belize City, Belize

David A. Laskow, MD, FACS
Associate Professor of Surgery
Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center
New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA

Lyle L. Moldawer, PhD
Professor of Surgery and Vice Chairman (Research)
University of Florida
College of Medicine
Gainesville, Florida, USA

Vinay M. Nadkarni, MD, FCCM
Medical Director
Center for Simulation, Advanced Education and Innovation
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Regardless of your profession or role in the critical care team, you will find opportunities to enhance your practice. Act by November 12, 2014, to take advantage of early registration discounts. Register online using your customer ID and password, or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

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Registration Now Open for 2015 MCCKAP

Registration is now open for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) 2015 Multidisciplinary Critical Care Knowledge Assessment Program (MCCKAP). The exam will be administered from February 26 to March 6, 2015.

The MCCKAP online exam assesses critical care fellowship programs nationally.  Held annually, the MCCKAP exam helps program directors:

  • Prepare fellows for the subspecialty board examinations in critical care
  • Identify specific areas of strength and weakness with lists of references and key terms for missed questions
  • Assess results for each individual fellow and the overall program, as well as the institution’s national ranking

Available in both adult and pediatric formats, the exam is offered exclusively online and consists of 200 multiple-choice questions pertaining to critical care knowledge and patient management. Exam content is developed by critical care professionals experienced in exam preparation and analysis.

Immediate preliminary scores and analysis are available to the examinee and the program director upon completion of the test. Final results will be available approximately five weeks following the exam.

Register online using your customer ID and password, or contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888. Sign-up by November 26, 2014, to take advantage of discounted registration rates.

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New iCritical Care Podcast Centers on Ebola Outbreak

In a recently released iCritical Care podcast, Margaret Parker, MD, MCCM, speaks with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) President-Elect Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FCCM, and Jay Varkey, MD, about the Ebola epidemic and how clinicians should be preparing for emerging infections. Dr. Varkey was on a team of clinicians at Emory University Hospital who successfully treated an American missionary and doctor infected with the Ebola virus.

SCCM Pod-242 Preparing for Emerging Infections

SCCM is monitoring the Ebola outbreak and will continue to provide pertinent information to the critical care community, such as this link to resources and articles centered on the Ebola epidemic recently made available by The New England Journal of Medicine.

Visit www.sccm.org/disaster for additional resources and the latest news related to the Ebola response.

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SSC Releases Updated Statement in Response to ProCESS and ARISE Trials

The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) released an updated statement regarding hemodynamic and oximetric monitoring. The statement is in response to the Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock (ProCESS) and the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) trials.

The statement highlights recently released data from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, which confirms that “adherence to quality improvement measures in severe sepsis and septic shock is associated with mortality decline.” The research has been published online ahead of print in Critical Care Medicine and in Intensive Care Medicine. The final print version is scheduled to appear in the January 2015 edition of Critical Care Medicine.

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