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April 3, 2014

Concise Critical Appraisal

What Is the Potential Impact of Utilizing Donated Kidneys from Newborns Undergoing Circulatory Death?
Latest News from the SCCM eCommunity

Education

Critical Care Ultrasound Courses Expected to Sell Out Early
Webcast to Discuss Obtaining Consent for Research in the ICU

SCCM News

New Project Dispatch Presentations Available For Viewing
Watch New Choosing Wisely® Videos
Nominate an FCCM Colleague for MCCM Designation
What Is the Potential Impact of Utilizing Donated Kidneys from Newborns Undergoing Circulatory Death?

More than 90,000 patients await kidney transplant, according to the U.S. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.  Approximately 16,000 transplants occur every year, but 35,000 patients are added to the list annually.

Because of this growing list of patients with end-stage renal disease who need new kidneys, transplant surgeons are seeking innovative ways to increase the donor pool. Recently, a number of transplant surgeons began utilizing younger and smaller kidney donors by transplanting their organs en bloc into single recipients.  Common reported complications of using smaller kidneys include increased graft thrombosis and hyperfiltration injury.  However, in their report on outcomes utilizing kidneys transplanted from donors weighing less than 15 kg (even some less than 10 kg), Sharma and coworkers reported 5-year graft survival at 92%, statistically no different than standard deceased or living donor kidney transplants.

Read more…

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Critical Care Ultrasound Courses Expected to Sell Out Early

Focused ultrasound examinations in the critical care setting have become an extension of the clinical assessment because of their rapid, precise detection capabilities. Assist in the immediate management of patients by learning or enhancing point-of-care ultrasound skills. SCCM offers three valuable ultrasound courses:

Critical Care Ultrasound

Gain the realistic training needed to perform and interpret ultrasound imaging during this two-day comprehensive course. Participants benefit from guided, focused skill stations featuring live models and interactive presentations to reinforce key learning points. Extensive faculty coverage ensures a significant hands-on experience for each participant.

 

Critical Care Ultrasound – Pediatric

New this year, SCCM’s Critical Care Ultrasound course is also offered in a pediatric format. This new two-day course focuses exclusively on how to perform and interpret pediatric ultrasound imaging. Participants receive a comprehensive, high-quality learning experience that combines hands-on technique through guided, focused skill stations and interactive presentations to reinforce key learning points.

Advanced Critical Care Ultrasound

Expand your fundamental skills and knowledge and focus on the specialty-specific use of echocardiography in the management of the critically ill patient. Participants are provided with important cardiovascular information for the noninvasive management of the hemodynamically unstable patient.

The summer ultrasound courses will be held August 17 to 19, 2014, at the Fairmont Chicago, Millennium Park, in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Space for the live courses is limited. Visit the ultrasound courses Web page and register today to guarantee your seat!

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Webcast to Discuss Obtaining Consent for Research in the ICU

The face of modern medicine has greatly changed over the past few decades. In order to continue to make advances in treating diseases, improving quality of care, and enhancing patient experiences, clinical investigators must find subjects willing to partner in research efforts.

In the webcast, Consent for Research in the ICU, from the Controversies in Critical Care series, Dan Thompson, MD, MA, FCCM, and Alex Kon, MD, FCCM, will discuss the challenges associated with obtaining pediatric and adult consent for complex research in critically ill patients. During the discussion, federal regulations, the SUPPORT study, and the potential impact of consent decisions on the well-being of patients and healthcare personnel will be reviewed.

Learning Objectives

• Discuss the fundamentals of consent for research

• Explain the issues of consent for research when the patients cannot consent for themselves

• Describe the difference between pediatric and adult consent for research

• Explore the problems in consent for complex research in critically ill patients

This webcast will take place on Friday, April 25, 2014, at 1:00 p.m. Central Time.

Register online today. The registration fee for this 60-minute webcast is $30 for SCCM members and $40 for nonmembers. Participants will receive 1 hour of continuing education credit. Please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888 to inquire about the $200 group rate for institutions that will host multiple participants.

The Controversies in Critical Care webcast series is a joint project of the SCCM Scientific Review Committee and the American College of Critical Care Medicine’s Ethics Committee. This series is intended to provide insight into topics in critical care medicine for which there is no clear consensus or unequivocal evidence for guiding practice decisions.

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New Project Dispatch Presentations Available For Viewing

The Project Dispatch — Disseminating Patient-Centered Outcomes Research to Healthcare Professionals — session held during the 43rd Critical Care Congress proved very successful and engaging, giving Society of Critical Care (SCCM) members an opportunity to highlight their successful patient- and family-centered projects. Presentations from the session have been released and are available here.

The release of these sessions comes on the heels of several other new resources supported by Project Dispatch, including:

Project Dispatch is supported by grant number R18HS021940 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

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Watch New Choosing Wisely® Videos

The Choosing Wisely® campaign has released new videos featuring leaders from across the healthcare spectrum talking about the challenges, opportunities and impact of the Choosing Wisely® campaign.

Choosing Wisely: Professionalism in Action

Choosing Wisely in Medical Education

Choosing Wisely: Inspiring Conversations to Reduce Overuse in Health Care

Strengthening Health Care Through Professionalism

The Critical Care Societies Collaborative released a list of “Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question” during the 43rd Critical Care Congress. The list identifies five targeted, evidence-based recommendations that can support physicians and patients in making wise choices about their care:

• Don’t order diagnostic tests at regular intervals (such as every day), but rather in response to specific clinical questions.

• Don’t transfuse red blood cells in hemodynamically stable, non-bleeding intensive care unit (ICU) patients with a hemoglobin concentration greater than 7 g/dL.

• Don’t use parenteral nutrition in adequately nourished critically ill patients within the first seven days of an ICU stay.

• Don’t deeply sedate mechanically ventilated patients without a specific indication and without daily attempts to lighten sedation.

• Don’t continue life support for patients at high risk for death or severely impaired functional recovery without offering patients and their families the alternative of care focused entirely on comfort.

Read more…

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Latest News from the SCCM eCommunity

The Society of Critical Care Medicine’s eCommunities offer critical care professionals the opportunity to connect, share and collaborate. Communities are open to SCCM members and nonmembers to facilitate knowledge sharing and improve care.

Log into the various SCCM eCommunities at www.sccm.org/eCommunity to be part of the discussion.

Latest SCCM eCommunity Posts

Fear and Anxiety is Healthy; Helping Patients and Families to Understand the Fears of Returning to Work after Traumatic Brain Injury
Twice I had to be told I had a rip in the seat of my pants.  All I could see as my vision came into focus was a floating man’s head six feet above my face. Before that, I was hearing shouting “Are you Ok? Are you OK?” coming from not one but multiple directions. When he helped me sit up, I immediately began squeezing my head with increasing pressure because it was spinning in frenzy. I squeezed my head harder and with more intensity without success. My head felt like it was an old tin spinning top just after the plastic handle had been pumped hundreds of times and released.  These are the realities of my personal experience of the initial accident which later would be diagnosed as a concussive traumatic brain injury.  I am a critical care practitioner and pharmacy faculty member, yet I attempted to convince myself I was fine until I walked to my car and the man followed closely behind reminding me multiple times that my pants were ripped and that I should take it easy.

Family Centered Care in the PICU
Family Centered Care (FCC) is an inherent part of all pediatric practice. However, until quite recently, families were not considered an integral part of the health care team when patients were cared for in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). In fact, restricted visiting hours, removal of family members for codes and invasive procedures, and efforts to maintain a “minimal stim environment” often led to a complete abdication of the family members’ roles as caregivers while the child was in the PICU.

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Nominate an FCCM Colleague for MCCM Designation

Fellows of the American College of Critical Care Medicine (FCCM) are invited to nominate their FCCM colleagues for the Master of Critical Care Medicine (MCCM) designation. The deadline for submitting nominations is April 30, 2016.

Master members of the College have distinguished themselves through outstanding contributions in research and education, as well as service to the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the field of critical care. They have achieved national and international professional prominence due to personal character, leadership and eminence in clinical practice. Candidates must have been a Fellow for at least 10 years.

For additional information on the MCCM designation, please contact Carol Prendergast at cprendergast@sccm.org or +1 847 827-6826.

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Hamilton Medical – Reduced time on the ventilator with ASV