Category Archives: SCCM News

Research Grants

Applications are now being accepted for investigator-initiated research focused on improving patient care both during and after an intensive care unit stay. SCCM member researchers should apply by August 1, 2017, to be considered for grant support in 2018.

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) offers several funding opportunities through the SCCM Research Grants for critical care professionals seeking support for their research that helps advance and improve clinician understanding of critical illness and patient care.

Funding will be provided by the following grants:

  • SCCM-Weil Research Grants, including up to two grants of $50,000 each
  • Discovery Research Grants, for a total of $100,000

To begin the application process for a grant, log in to www.MySCCM.org, and click on “Submit an application for SCCM Research Grants” located in the right column.

Help spread the word and make sure to share these opportunities with your colleagues. Note that you must be a current SCCM member to apply for the SCCM Research Grants.

If you have any questions, please contact SCCM Customer Service at +1 847 827-6888.

Physician Preparedness Survey

Society of Critical Care Medicine member physicians are encouraged to take a brief survey on physician preparedness for the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and Alternative Payment Models (APMs). This survey is being sponsored by the Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS) to gather information from physicians on their plans to participate in these incentive programs.

This survey will remain open for the next few weeks. This is a short survey that will take less than five minutes of your time. Thank you in advance for your participation.

Call for Award Nominations

Does your organization have an innovative palliative and end-of-life care program? The Circle of Life Awards: Celebrating Innovation in Palliative and End-of-Life Care is seeking to honor programs that can serve as models for other healthcare organizations working to embed palliative and end-of-life care in a variety of care settings.

The Circle of Life Awards recognize models that improve access and care delivery for palliative and end-of-life care in hospices, hospitals, healthcare systems, long-term care facilities, and other direct care providers. Top honors will go to up to three programs or organizations.

Learn more about this award from past honorees and by visiting the Circle of Life Award website.

Applications for the 2018 award are due August 14, 2017, and are now available at www.aha.org/circleoflife. For any questions, please contact circleoflife@aha.org.

Patient- and Family-Centered Care Survey

The World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine (WFSICCM) is launching an initiative to solicit exemplars from national scientific societies on the types of patient- and family-centered care/engagement practices being implemented worldwide. A growing number of studies are addressing patient-centered care and strategies to engage family members to promote best outcomes for critically ill patients. However, the degree to which these practices are being implemented worldwide is not known.

The survey “Patient and Family Centered Care in the ICU: Worldwide Exemplars” is being launched to obtain information on a global scale. The information provided will be useful to inform the global critical care community of current initiatives and strategies, and potential barriers to implementing patient-centered outcomes research and family-centered care/engagement to enhance intensive care unit care delivery.

Hemodynamic Support Guidelines

The American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) recently released guidelines addressing hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock.

Titled “American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Parameters for Hemodynamic Support of Pediatric and Neonatal Septic Shock,” the material was published in the June 2017 issue of Critical Care Medicine.

This update of the 2007 ACCM guidelines is available for free download and includes major new recommendations such as the need to address hemodynamic support of septic shock at the institutional level.

New VCCR Podcast

Tune into the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) new Virtual Critical Care Rounds (VCCR) Podcast series for in-depth interviews on critical care topics addressing the most challenging aspects of intensive care unit fellowship and residency. This series complements SCCM’s VCCR program.

The latest installment in the series is now available:

SCCMPod-VCCR3 Activated Charcoal in the Overdose Patient

After listening, keep the conversation going on twitter using #VCCRounds.

Family-Centered Care Award

The Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Yale-New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Connecticut, USA, received this year’s Family-Centered Care Innovation Award in recognition for the unit’s novel methods for providing care to critically ill and injured patients and their families.

For the past four years, this multidisciplinary team of neurointensivists, surgeons, nurses, advanced practice providers, social workers, business associates, research staff, and clinician trainees has developed and rigorously tested an evolving family-centered service model for providing care to patients and their families.

The team implemented this service-model in two phases: The first phase promoted more frequent and direct communication between NICU staff and patient families by encouraging family members to attend daily morning intensive care unit (ICU) work rounds. The second phase focused on communicating with families during scheduled, advertised afternoon “family rounds” and providing emotional support to families of comfort measures only (CMO) patients with “memory box” care packages.

As part of the Society’s Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR)-ICU Collaborative, the Yale-New Haven Hospital NICU has formed a new Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC). The PFAC has been meeting and making recommendations to prioritize where the NICU team can improve upon its family-centered care model for the next phase, specifically looking at how to reach those families whose needs may not have been addressed because they were unable to attend prespecified rounding times.

“We are looking forward to the PFAC pointing us in new, effective directions,” said NICU team member David Y. Hwang, MD. “We have already gotten great ideas from our new council for plans for potential projects related to managing family expectations regarding ICU alarms, facilitating communication among family members for the same patient, and improving transitions of care from the NICU to the floor.”

It is time again to nominate a unit or program for the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Family-Centered Care Innovation Award. If you know a unit or program that demonstrates novel, effective methods for providing care to critically ill and injured patients and their families, nominate them today.

Additional SCCM Awards
The Society offers numerous awards that recognize dedication and contributions to the field in a variety of areas. Nominate yourself or a colleague, or recognize your entire intensive care unit (ICU) team. Most award recipients receive complimentary registration to the 47th Critical Care Congress. Apply for these opportunities by August 1, 2017.

NCCARM: Wear Blue Tomorrow

You are encouraged to wear blue tomorrow (May 19) in celebration of National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month (NCCARM)!

Also, make sure to send us group photos of your ICU team celebrating NCCARM. If you do, you may become a star! That’s because the Society of Critical Care Medicine is seeking to highlight teams from around the world in an effort to show the global reach of critical care. Submit your team photo for a chance to be featured throughout the year and during the 47th Critical Care Congress. Share your photos on Twitter using #NCCARM, or post them to the Society’s Facebook page. You can also send your pictures to criticalconnections@sccm.org.

Podcast on Family-Centered Care

In the newly available iCritical Care podcast SCCM Pod-339 Guidelines for Family-Centered Care in the ICU, Ranjit Deshpande, MD, speaks with Guideline co-chairs Judy E. Davidson, DNP, RN, FAAN, FCCM, and J. Randall Curtis, MD, MPH, about the recently released “Guidelines for Family-Centered Care in the Neonatal, Pediatric, and Adult ICU.”

Listen to the podcast and then watch the Congress talk on family-centered care and research in the intensive care unit.

The new guidelines are based on evidence showing that family-centered care may prevent or lessen the impact of post-intensive care syndrome—lingering physical and mental health effects that can occur in family members as well as patients. Access the guidelines and related tools at www.sccm.org/guidelines.

Honoring Two Legends

If you have not already done so, you are encouraged to read about the 2017 winners of the Society’s Lifetime Achievement Award and Distinguished Investigator Award: Patrick M. Kochanek, MD, MCCM, and Gordon R. Bernard, MD, respectively.

Dr. Kochanek was honored for his contributions to the understanding of traumatic and ischemic brain injury in the field of critical care, among a myriad of other accomplishments. Dr. Bernard was honored for his many research contributions, including those related to improving the care and outcomes of critically ill patients with sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Please note that the Society of Critical Care Medicine offers numerous awards that recognize dedication and contributions to the field in a variety of areas. Visit www.sccm.org/awards to learn more.

VCCR Podcast Series

The Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) is pleased to announce the Virtual Critical Care Rounds (VCCR) Podcast, a new podcast series that will offer in-depth interviews on critical care topics while addressing the most challenging aspects of intensive care unit fellowship and residency. This series complements SCCM’s VCCR program.

After listening to the podcasts, keep the conversation going on twitter using #VCCRounds.

Critical Care Awareness Month

May is National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month (NCCARM)! ICUs mark this special month in various ways, from sharing blue treats with staff or providing educational symposia, staff recognition ceremonies or ICU tours. Other units invite former patients and their families to meet staff and share their progress.

Regardless of how you celebrate NCCARM this year, be sure you wear blue on Friday, May 19, 2017! Also, make sure to send us group photos of your ICU team celebrating NCCARM. If you do, you may become a star! That’s because the Society of Critical Care Medicine is seeking to highlight teams from around the world in an effort to show the global reach of critical care. Submit your team photo for a chance to be featured throughout the year and during the 47th Critical Care Congress. Share your photos on Twitter using #NCCARM, or post them to the Society’s Facebook page. You can also send your pictures to criticalconnections@sccm.org.

Resources for Researchers

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) awarded a large 5-year R-24 research infrastructure grant to Society member Dale Needham, FCPA, MD, PhD, for a project entitled “Improving Long-Term Outcomes Research for Acute Respiratory Failure.”

Dr. Needham is Director of the Outcomes After Critical Illness and Surgery (OACIS) Group, a multidisciplinary clinical and research group focused on understanding and improving patient outcomes after critical illness and surgery, at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

This NIH-funded project has completed the development of many resources for researchers conducting long-term follow-up of patients surviving acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARF/ARDS), including:

  • Recommendations for long-term outcomes and associated measurement instruments for research in this patient population. A database of recommended survey instruments and clinical testing methods for evaluating the long-term physical, cognitive, and mental health outcomes of survivors of ARF/ARDS is available at www.improvelto.com/instruments.
  • Practical tools for maximizing patient cohort retention for longitudinal long-term outcomes research studies. Cohort retention tools are available at www.improvelto.com/cohort-retention-tools.
  • Statistical tools and programs to appropriately address the competing risk of mortality in analyzing long-term functional outcomes in this patient population. A software tool that imputes missing data among survivors and then implements statistical approaches for addressing mortality when evaluating long-term functional outcomes is available at www.improvelto.com/stats-tools.

Visit www.improvelto.com to learn more about this project and stay up to date on its progress.

PANGEA Study Findings

The April 2017 issue of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine (PCCM) released the latest findings from the Prevalence of Acute critical Neurological disease in children: a Global Epidemiological Assessment (PANGEA) study.

This study offers a worldwide snapshot of acute neurologic conditions among critically ill children. One-hundred-seven hospital ICUs participated by providing information on children with acute neurologic conditions, contributing information on a total of 924 patients.

Overall, 16.2% of children in the reporting ICUs had acute neurologic conditions. Many children had preexisting medical conditions, but 61% had normal neurologic status before their current hospitalizations.

Cardiac arrest, resulting in lack of blood flow to the brain, was the most common overall cause of acute neurologic conditions (23%). Other causes included traumatic brain injury (19%), central nervous system infection or inflammation (16%), and stroke or a mass, such as a brain tumor (9% each).

The study found that regions differed in terms of most common condition reported. Infection/inflammation was the most common cause in Asia, South America, and the sole African hospital contributing to the study. In all other regions, cardiac arrest was the main cause.

Ericka L. Fink, MD, MS, and coauthors believe that the PANGEA data “suggest a vital need for resources to assist in the challenge of improving outcomes for these children throughout the span of the periods of emergency care through to rehabilitation.”

Society of Critical Care Medicine members who are also part of the Pediatrics Section can access the full content of PCCM online by logging into MySCCM.

Podcast on Acute Care Research

In the newly available iCritical Care podcast SCCM Pod-338 Building Global Collaboration in Acute Care Research Ludwig Lin, MD, speaks with John C. Marshall, MD, FRCSC, FACS, about his talk given at the 46th Critical Care Congress, “Building Global Collaboration in Acute Care Research.” Listen to the podcast and then watch Dr. Marshall’s Congress talk and familiarize yourself with the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s newest endeavor: Discovery, the Critical Care Research Network.

You can listen to all of the Society’s podcasts at www.sccm.org/iCriticalCare. Here are the latest:

SCCM Pod-337 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Sustained Neuromuscular Blockade in the Adult Critically Ill Patient: 2016 Update

SCCM Pod-336 Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines: 2016 Update

SCCM Pod-335 SCCM President Ruth Kleinpell Discusses the Year Ahead

SCCM Pod-334 Vasopressors: Future Research